Feike de Jong

Feike de Jong

Feike de Jong is a journalist and urban researcher in Mexico City. He is the creator of the app, “Limits: On foot along the edge of the megalopolis of the Valley of Mexico."

Diableros, loaders of goods and merchandise, walk through the aisles of La Merced, one of the oldest and biggest traditional markets within Mexico City.

A Day in the Life of Mexico City's 'Diableros'

A profession that dates back to Aztec times, most today are indigenous farmers on the grey divide between migration and seasonal work in the city.

A volunteer wearing a dust mask rides a bike in the Roma neighborhood of Mexico City, Wednesday, September 20, 2017.

Parks and Bicycles Were Lifelines After Mexico City's Earthquake

Open spaces and nimble rides were crucial as volunteers collected and dispersed supplies amid toppled infrastructure.

A traditional band of performers poses for a photo during the celebration of Santiago Apostol in Iztapalapa.

Keeping Village Traditions Alive In a Megacity

Religious events help maintain organizational frameworks and a sense of identity in the formerly rural and mostly indigenous areas that now form Iztapalapa—Mexico City’s largest district. There’s honor to be had for the few who get to organize such events.

Panoramic view of Ciudad Nezahualcoyotl.

How a Slum Became a City

Ciudad Nezahualcoyotl was developed on top of the swampy remains of Lake Texoco by dubious subdividers after World War II. Thanks to some of its earliest residents, “Neza” has become a thriving hub of culture and commerce with running water and paved roads just outside Mexico’s capital.

Mexico City's Endless Commute

Every day, workers across the region endure some of the world’s most crowded streets and subway cars for higher wages in the city center.

The Women Who Rule Mexico City

The inner-city barrios have had female leaders for decades.