Gillian B. White

Gillian B. White

Gillian B. White is a deputy editor of The Atlantic.

In the Sharing Economy, No One's an Employee

Such jobs may offer flexibility and other benefits, but traditional legal protections for workers aren't part of the package.

The G Word: Gentrification and Its Many Meanings

Changing neighborhoods may be a class issue, but in America, that means it’s also a racial one.

America's Aging Population Is Bad News for Women's Careers

Unless the U.S. can put policies in place to support family caretakers.

Stranded: How America's Failing Public Transportation Increases Inequality

The nation’s crumbling infrastructure makes it hard for those living in poverty to access jobs, quality groceries, and good schools.

Damn the Developers?

Regular old home buyers are having a hard time finding places they can afford. Are investors to blame?

What Sweden and Japan Can Teach the U.S. About Its Aging Workforce

The global population is getting older. What can countries do?

Women Are Owning More and More Small Businesses

But don't celebrate just yet.

The Very Real Hardship of Unpredictable Work Schedules

The 17 percent of workers who deal with erratic scheduling tend to be those who can afford instability the least.

What Education Can and Can't Do for Economic Inequality

A new study looks at whether or not a college degree can chip away at income disparities.

Stuck With a House That Can't Be Sold

Even though the housing market is improving, some owners with troubled properties won't see relief anytime soon.

Staying Close to Home, No Matter What

Fewer than half of Americans say they're likely to relocate, even if they think their town is headed in the wrong direction.

What Do Americans Prioritize When Picking a Place to Live?

According to a new poll, economic mobility and diversity are key components of a good city or town.

How Do Americans Feel About Where They Live?

The most recent Allstate/National Journal Heartland Monitor poll asked Americans to assess the cities and towns they call home.

What 27 Weeks of Unemployment Does to the American Worker

Though the economy is improving, a third of those still looking for work have been jobless for more than six months.

Why the Gap Between Worker Pay and Productivity Is So Problematic

Labor has become more efficient and profitable, but employees aren't sharing in the benefits.

The Rich Get Richer—and More Educated

Wealthy Americans have seen major growth when it comes to educational attainment, but the poorest Americans still struggle to graduate.

Rural America's Silent Housing Crisis

Accounting for only 20 percent of the population, residents of more isolated areas struggle to find a safe, affordable place to live—and to make anyone else care.

Should Cities Have a Different Minimum Wage Than Their State?

Debates over wage-requirements are common at the federal and state level, but more municipalities are joining the conversation in an attempt to address variations in the cost of living.

Can Immigrants Save the Housing Market?

While some remain cynical about homeownership, the U.S.'s foreign-born population still regards it as a symbol of attaining the American Dream.

In the Search for Affordable Childcare, Location Is Everything

The cost of center-based services for children varies widely throughout the U.S., and so can the availability of financial assistance for low-income families.