Jessica Leigh Hester

Brian Snyder/Reuters

After the Marches, What Happens Next?

Many attendees of the Women’s March viewed the demonstrations as a jumping-off point; others saw them as the continuation of decades of work. Here, some of them share their stories.

Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Curating Symbols of a Country in Turmoil

Museums and libraries are collecting ephemera that encapsulates social upheaval.

Rebel Nell/Jacob Lewkow Photography

The Detroit Start-Up Helping Women Craft a Path Out of Homelessness

How a nonprofit and a small jewelry company team up to help homeless women get back on their feet.

Courtesy Andrea Aragón

The Guatemalan Towns Plastered With Icons of America

When workers emigrate to the U.S., the regions they leave behind often adopt identities that straddle borders.

Alexander McBride Wilson

The Phone Booth for Japanese Mourners

On the outskirts of Otsuchi, a town battered by the 2011 tsunami, a rotary phone is a gathering place for people to recall loved ones lost.

Oscar Boyson

A Globetrotting Filmmaker, Seeking Answers About Our Urban Future

Oscar Boyson’s documentary is a jet-setting look at problems and solutions in cities centers across the world.

Mel Evans/AP

Enlisting Cities in the War on Food Waste

Metropolitan regions are “really important players in this whole picture,” says Dana Gunders of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Courtesy Michael Hauser/Central Business District Foundation

Bringing Christmas Back Downtown

Shoppers once flocked to the centers of American cities during the holidays. Today, boosters are using the season to spur urban revival.

Courtesy Nikkei National Museum (2010.23.2.4.236)/Landscapes of Injustice

Excavating the Legacy of the Internment Camps

Through new research and exhibitions, historians are racing to preserve stories from the forced relocation of Americans and Canadians of Japanese descent during World War II.

Carlos Barria/Reuters

What Makes Food 'American'?

A new book samples eight flavors that unite people across decades and demographics.

Moyan Brenn/Flickr

1.4 Million People, 1 Bookstore

The Bronx is set to lose its only bookseller. An independent shop hopes to take its place.

Andy Clark/Reuters

Three Cities Where Santa Acts Like a Local

Holiday celebrations in Houston, Chicago, and Portland have a distinctly hometown flair.

Molly Stanard

The Town That Forgot About Its Japanese Internment Camp

A small town in rural Ontario harbored a World War II-era secret. Should it find a way to preserve a dark moment in its history, or let the past disappear for good?

Courtesy First We Feast

When Food Gets Gentrified

A new documentary about New York’s chopped cheese sandwich digs in to what happens when pricey restaurants adapt bodega fare.

Courtesy Erik Paul Howard

When Cycling and Storytelling Mingle

Detroit’s Pedal to Porch project hopes neighbors will slow down and meet each other.

Scott Hocking

To Understand Detroit, Look in at Night

A new exhibition uses darkness to highlight the nuances of blight and revitalization—and the culture that has stayed rooted all along.

Courtesy of City Harvest

Anatomy of a Thanksgiving Turkey Giveaway

What it takes to deliver 10,000 birds to needy families.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

The Activist Workout

This newsletter encourages readers to develop the stamina for civic engagement.