Jessica Leigh Hester

Jessica Leigh Hester

Jessica Leigh Hester is a senior associate editor at CityLab, covering environment and culture. Her work also appears in the New Yorker, The Atlantic, New York Times, Modern Farmer, Village Voice, Slate, BBC, NPR, and other outlets.

A Brief History of Music Festival Fails

To avoid the next Fyre Festival-style debacle, organizers should heed these five lessons.  

A black-and-white illustration of a shore, hill, forests, and clouds lets users concentrate on the sounds

Here's What Manhattan Sounded Like in 1609

A new virtual reality project reconstructs the city’s historic soundscape.

A photograph of a clunky, rusted wall-mounted surveillance camera

How to Disappear

Is it possible to move through a smart city undetected?

Riders on the Cyclone roller coaster at Coney Island

The Rituals of Coney Island's Opening Day

For locals, the urban amusement park season starts months before summer’s peak.

A chef prepares meals at one of Food for Soul's refettorios

These Sleek Soup Kitchens Fight Hunger and Loneliness

Chef Massimo Bottura’s Refettorios will soon land in U.S. cities to fight food waste and isolation, thanks to a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation.

A women collects air quality data in a trash-strewn parking lot full of cars and in West Oakland, California.

Citizen Science in the Age of the Cloud

A new documentary series celebrates regular folks interacting with data, but leaves some big questions answered.

When Your City Is Gone

A new book invites Seattle residents to conjure the haunts that have vanished.

Refugees Around the Table

A new campaign is hosting dinner parties around the world to build communities and strengthen networks.

Sense and the City

How did 18th-century urban dwellers make sense of their loud and stinky worlds? Historian Carolyn Purnell explains.

The NYC Artist Excavating 'Alternative Facts'

Joe Bochynski’s fake archaeology challenges viewers to figure out what’s believable and what’s not.

The Private Lives of Vacant Homes

An art installation celebrates the spirit of boarded-up blocks of Baltimore and Japan.

What a Refugee Chef Wants You to Know About the 'Day Without Immigrants'

Ryan McCaskey, the chef and proprietor at Chicago’s Michelin-starred Acadia restaurant, was evacuated from Vietnam as a toddler. Here’s why he shut down his restaurant in support of immigrant workers.

The Wisdom of Garbage

Researchers are digging into heaps of discarded food to uncover clues about why we throw so much of it away—and how cities can cut the waste.

Here Are the Gerrymandering Valentine's Cards You Need Right Now

Map enthusiast Blair Thornburgh is so fascinated by redistricting that she whipped up some love letters to democracy.

How to Observe Your City

A new book offers a toolkit to help urbanites look closely and carefully.

Politics on the Plate

In a divisive climate, restaurants across the U.S. are dishing up a serving of activism.

The Surprising Relevance of an All-Night Philosophy Rave

The Brooklyn Public Library teamed up with the French Embassy for a festival that argues that slow, deliberate thinking matters more than ever.

Picturing 100 Years of Life Aboard the Paris Métro

A new photography book captures the cultures that collide underground.

After the Marches, What Happens Next?

Many attendees of the Women’s March viewed the demonstrations as a jumping-off point; others saw them as the continuation of decades of work. Here, some of them share their stories.