Joe Pinsker

Joe Pinsker

Joe Pinsker is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers families and education.

Mar-a-Lago

Americans Like Their Homes Big. The Rest of the World Doesn’t Keep Up

The U.S. is in the top tier of house sizes internationally—and it’s not just because of McMansions.

A residence hall at the University of Southern California

College Dorms Are Getting Way Too Nice. Here's Why.

Many of today’s students are living in far better-appointed accommodations than now-graying alumni did.

The World’s Population Will Stop Growing in 80 Years

When that happens, there are going to be a lot more old people, plus emotional and economic consequences to deal with.

Are McMansions Making Everyone Unhappy?

Homes have gotten bigger, but Americans aren’t any more pleased with the extra space.

When Was the Last Time Every American Child Feared the Same Thing?

Students used to duck and cover. Now they have lockdown drills.

Women wait in a long line for the public bathroom at a sports arena.

The Long Lines for Women’s Bathrooms Could Be Eliminated. Why Haven’t They Been?

It’s been more than 30 years since states started trying to achieve “potty parity,” but many queues are still unequal.

What the Ultrarich Really Want

There’s a reason many aren’t satisfied with the wealth they already have.

Uber, But for Driving Your Kids Around

A slew of small companies have launched in recent years, offering parents a way to outsource their daily driving.

The Curse of America’s Illogical School-Day Schedule

It starts too early for teens’ sleep patterns, and ends too early for working parents. Does the country have to be stuck with it?

A man is pictured in a hotel lobby.

How the Hotel Industry Views Its Future (and Airbnb)

A conversation with the editor of Hotels, a trade publication covering full-service and luxury lodging.

Shoppers are pictured.

The Future of Retail Is Stores That Aren’t Stores

“Honey, I’m about to run to the town square—you need anything?”

Why Most Americans Still Aren't Ready to Give Up Tipping

But there’s a chance that today’s experiments on the fringes of dining could one day infiltrate mainstream food culture.

What Apple Farmers Really Think About People Who Pick Apples for Fun

Don’t treat the growers like they’re bumpkins.

Ikea's Possible Solution to Shrinking Apartments: Movable Walls

Just conjure up a bedroom at night, and then make it disappear.

How Rich People Raise Rich Kids

Even when they’re adopted, the children of the wealthy grow up to be just as well-off as their parents.

America's Fantasy of a Four-Day Workweek

Will Americans ever let out a deep breath, crack open a beer, and say, “Thank God it’s Thursday”?

Why the Massive Air-Bag Recall Won't Make Driving Much Safer

Potentially deadly car parts shouldn’t be the least of everyone’s worries—but they shouldn’t be the most, either.

What Airlines Don't Get About Delays

By presenting the same limited information to fliers in a very different way, carriers might be able to make everyone a little less aggravated.

Why the South Has Far Fewer Breweries Than the Rest of the U.S.

What do you get when you mix corporate interest with religiously motivated temperance? A whole lot of Budweiser.

Finland, Home of the $103,000 Speeding Ticket

Most of Scandinavia determines fines based on income. Could such a system work in the U.S.?