Juan Pablo Garnham

Juan Pablo Garnham was the editor of CityLab Latino. He has also worked for El Diario and NY1 Noticias, in New York. In his home country of Chile, he worked as a reporter for Qué Pasa magazine and El Mercurio newspaper. He is based in Miami.

Traffic in Mexico City, where mega-commutes are a grim fact of life.

3 Cities, 3 Terrible Commutes

A new documentary follows the epic journeys faced by commuters in Istanbul, Mexico City, and Los Angeles.

Aerial view of abandoned, unfinished homes in a barren landscape.

A Drone's Eye View of Spain's Housing Bubble

“We need to remember these places, what we did here and what we should learn for the future,” says photographer Markel Redondo. “We need to know that these buildings are still there.”

A rendering of Sweetwater, Florida's Eighth Street, reimagined as a tree-lined boulevard.

Don't Just Rebuild the Collapsed Pedestrian Bridge in Miami

Instead, a pair of local street planners propose redesigning the street below.

Mirna Vasquez hugs her teacher, Maria Victoria Mendoza, in her classroom in Brentwood, N.Y.

The Educational Crisis Among the Children of Immigrants

Anxiety and absenteeism are on the rise in public schools with large immigrant populations, according to a new UCLA study, and academics are suffering.

Food Aid Doesn't Cover the Price of Food in Almost Every County in America

A new map shows that SNAP benefits lag behind need, even as the GOP mulls different ways to cut back on food aid.

A Portrait of Parkland

Before the shooting Wednesday, some families who moved to the Florida suburb looking for safe neighborhoods and top-notch schools considered it “paradise.”

A rescue worker talks with others below as he stands inside an apartment building whose first four floors collapsed, in the Lindavista neighborhood of Mexico City on Wednesday, September 20, 2017.

The Booming Mexico City Neighborhoods Shaken by the Earthquake

The sought-after enclaves of Condesa and La Roma were among the parts of the city that sustained significant wreckage.

Resurrecting L.A.'s Lost Latino Murals

The city’s walls have been one of the few places for minorities to tell their side of history. But too often, even those attempts have been thwarted.

The Mass Latino School Walkouts In Response to DACA's End

The protest method has a vibrant history in Latino youth communities.

Pedestrians stroll down Las Ramblas in Barcelona in 2015.

Terror In Barcelona’s Pedestrian Heart

Understanding Las Ramblas, the historic street targeted in Thursday’s van attack.

Onlookers in Barcelona in the aftermath of a fatal van attack.

The Barcelona Terror Attack: What We Know

The driver targeted the city’s pedestrian heart in the incident, which killed 14 people and injured many more.

A homeless Iraq war veteran walks out of a shelter in Long Beach in 2009.

To Fight Homelessness, Long Beach Turned Meetings Into Action

Across departments, coordination is key.

Butcher Gerardo 'Tolo' Martínez in a scene from "A Good Butcher."

A Hispanic Butcher Illustrates the Changing Culture of North Carolina

This short documentary offers a glimpse into a butcher's store where whites, African Americans, and Hispanics are united by food.

A Better Way to Confront MS-13

Fear of deportation in immigrant communities will make fighting transnational gangs harder, according to police leaders.

What's Behind the Rise of MS-13?

The street gang that stalks the suburbs of Long Island has become a focus of President Trump’s efforts to link immigration and crime.

Miami's Plan Z bike path

Can a Bike Bridge Make Miami Safer for Cyclists?

Advocates hope this long elevated pathway is just the first step toward changing the city’s bike culture.

Could Immigration Policy Turn Vancouver Into Silicon Valley?

The Canadian city already hosts a range of companies, from Amazon to Hootsuite. After President Trump’s executive order, it could really capitalize on a tech sector built by foreign workers.

Why Did Miami Submit to Trump's Executive Order?

The financial toll of challenging Trump on sanctuary cities is still unknown. But the costs of compliance—in terms of security and impact on immigrant communities—are quite clear.

How a Region in Chile Survived an Earthquake With Just a Couple of Scratches

Most of the buildings and houses in the island of Chiloé are made out of lumber, which can resist strong shakes.

São Paulo Scores Grand Prize in Bloomberg Mayors Challenge

The Brazilian megacity triumphed over urban innovation projects from Colombia, Chile, and Mexico to take home top honors from Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Will Rio Be a 'Smarter' City After the Olympic Games?

The city installed expensive new technology for the event, but a recent study finds the investment might not pay off in the long run.