Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps is a staff writer for CityLab covering housing, architecture, and politics. He previously worked as a senior editor for Architect magazine.

photo: San Francisco skyline

Would Capping Office Space Ease San Francisco’s Housing Crunch?

Proposition E would put a moratorium on new commercial real estate if affordable housing goals aren’t met. But critics aren’t convinced it would be effective.   

photo: The New York City Housing Authority's Ocean Bay Apartments Bayside complex in Queens.

As Trump Ditches a Fair Housing Rule, New York City Doubles Down

HUD’s reversal of an Obama-era mandate on discrimination comes as the De Blasio administration releases its own, very different fair housing blueprint.

Denser Housing Is Gaining Traction on America’s East Coast

Maryland joins Virginia with a new proposal to tackle the affordable housing crisis. And it’s sweeping in its ambition.

With New Democratic Majority, Virginia Sees a Push for Denser Housing

Facing an affordability crisis, the state is floating an “upzoning” bill that would legalize duplex housing in any place that currently bans it.

photo: President Trump with HUD Secretary Ben Carson.

Trump’s Plan to Criminalize Homelessness Is Taking Shape

As advocates and service providers brace for an executive order on homelessness, HUD Secretary Ben Carson heads to Houston.

photo: A residential block in Long Island City in Queens, New York.

The Right to Eviction Counsel Is Gaining Momentum

As New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio expands tenant protections, a pair of U.S. senators introduce the Eviction Crisis Act to help renters get legal help.

photo: Robert Marbut, the incoming director of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness,

The Consultant Leading the White House Push Against Homelessness

In Texas and Florida, Robert Marbut Jr. sold cities on a controversial model for providing homeless services. Now he’s bringing it to the White House.

photo: Agriculture Secretary Sonny Purdue

What the USDA’s New Food Stamp Rule Will Do

By tightening food stamp work requirements, the Trump administration limits states’ ability to aid high-unemployment areas. And more regulations are coming.

The Baltimore Museum of Art Made a Pledge to Buy Art by Women. Is It Just a Stunt?

The museum will only purchase artwork made by women in 2020. That won’t do much, if anything, to change the balance of representation in its collection.

photo: passengers in D.C.'s Metro

The ‘Namewashing’ of Public Transit

D.C.’s Metro plans to raise extra revenue by having companies buy naming rights for public transit stations. But corporate “namewashing” may not be easy money.

photo: Minnesota Congresswoman Ilhan Omar

What a Trillion-Dollar Housing Pledge Looks Like

Representative Ilhan Omar’s Homes for All Act would fund the construction of 12 million new homes in the U.S. over 10 years, mostly as public housing.  

photo: A stylish new funeral parlor called Exit Here in London.

Death Be Not Dull

U.K. restaurateur Oliver Peyton’s newest project, a style-forward funeral home called Exit Here, aims to shake up a very traditional industry.

Bernie Sanders and AOC Unveil a Green New Deal for Public Housing

The Green New Deal for Public Housing Act would commit up to $180 billion over a decade to upgrading 1.2 million federally owned homes.

D.C.’s Vacant Stadium Dilemma

RFK Stadium is taking up a very desirable plot of federal land in Washington, D.C.—and no one can agree what to do with it.

Photo: More than 120,000 enumerators gathered data for the 1940 census.

The Sum of All 2020 Census Fears

The 2020 count will be the first census to go online, and it faces many threats, from cyberattacks and scam artists to security fears and undercount risks.

Topeka's mayor at CityLab DC.

The Fight Against Gun Violence Depends on Where You Live

In the face of federal inaction, mayors are increasingly trying gun policies that are tailored to their geography.

An old apartment building and empty lot and new modern construction

Who Will Presidential Candidates' Redlining Plans Actually Benefit?

Housing plans by Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, and Pete Buttigieg intend redress for racist redlining housing practices, but who will actually benefit?

a photo of a WeWork office building

What WeWork’s Demise Could Do to NYC Real Estate

The troubled coworking company is the largest office tenant in New York City. What happens to the city’s commercial real estate market if it goes under?

a photo of Marin County

Will the Supreme Court Strike Down Inclusionary Zoning?

A Marin County lawsuit has conservatives and housing advocates preparing to face off over the constitutionality of a powerful affordable housing tool.

a photo of New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Would AOC's National Rent Control Solve the Housing Crisis, or Make It Even Worse?

As Oregon and California enact new rent control laws to combat the affordable housing crisis, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez proposes strict rent caps nationwide.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio eats a corn dog at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa.

Why Do People Love to Hate Bill de Blasio?

The New York mayor succeeded in uniting the left and right in mocking him. But here’s the thing: De Blasio's record as a progressive leader is actually strong.