Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps is a staff writer for CityLab covering housing, architecture, and politics. He previously worked as a senior editor for Architect magazine.

Maria Romano stands behind one of her three children, Jennifer, 10, as she gets something to eat in their Harlem apartment in New York Thursday, June 3, 2005

Why HUD Wants to Restrict Assistance for Immigrants

A proposal by Ben Carson’s agency would eject immigrant families from public housing to make way for the "most vulnerable." Housing advocates aren't buying it.

When Tech Makes Food Insecurity Worse

Two UX designers are making art based on a shared frustration: Government tech ideas that don’t incorporate people into the process.

A photo of the Notre-Dame Cathedral fire in Paris.

Amid Notre-Dame’s Destruction, There’s Hope for Restoration

Flames consumed the roof and spire of the 13th-century cathedral in Paris. The good news: Gothic architecture is built to handle this kind of disaster.

A photo of an IRS tax examiner protesting outside his office during the partial government shutdown in January.

The Progressives Making the Case for Monthly Tax Refunds

Expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit to include people without kids or traditional jobs would be a powerful poverty-fighting tool, says a growing coalition of Democrats.

The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

A photo of a mural of Chuck Brown, the godfather of go-go, with former D.C. Mayor Marion Barry.

Do Cultural Plans Really Help Cities Save Their Art and Music Scenes?

From D.C. to Dallas, cities are drafting documents to help protect their cultural resources from economic changes. But too often, these plans lack teeth.

Can Stacey Abrams Rescue the 2020 Census?

The former gubernatorial candidate and Democratic rising star has launched a nonprofit to help Georgia’s underrepresented communities get counted in 2020.  

U.S. 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg speaks at the 2019 National Action Network National Convention in New York.

Pete Buttigieg and the Police Department: Race Record Under Scrutiny

After a speech surfaced with Pete Buttigieg saying "All Lives Matter" in 2015, racial issues in the South Bend police department, and Buttigieg's role in them, are being scrutinized.

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg  testifying before Congress in April 2018.

Behind HUD’s Housing Discrimination Charges Against Facebook

The charges levied by Ben Carson outline powerful Facebook advertising tools that enable allegedly sweeping violations of the Fair Housing Act.

A photo of San Antonio's Latino High Line

A ‘Latino High Line’ Promises Change for San Antonio

The San Pedro Creek Culture Park stands to be a transformative project for nearby neighborhoods. To fight displacement, the city is creating a risk mitigation fund.

A photo of U.S. senators and 2020 Democratic Party hopefuls Cory Booker and Kamala Harris

Cory Booker and Kamala Harris Want a Monthly IRS Tax Credit for Rent

The 2020 Democratic Party hopefuls are both planning bills that would create a tax credit for housing rental assistance every month. How would that work?

The Women of the Bauhaus

Walter Gropius’s lofty rhetoric about equality fell short of the essentialist differences that the art school’s founders perceived between the sexes (and imposed on women at the school).

The Brutal Austerity of Trump’s Huge 2020 Budget

The president’s wish list for 2020 mixes massive military spending boosts with slashes to Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance, and other domestic needs.

A photo of the Newseum in Washington, D.C.

What the Fall of the Newseum Says About News, and Museums

The D.C. museum devoted to a free press will sell its building to Johns Hopkins after years of financial struggle. But the Newseum could still have a bright future.

The NRA Is Targeting San Jose’s Proposed Gun Law

Mayor Sam Liccardo wants gun stores to record all sales transactions, in an effort to prevent “straw purchases” that contribute to illegal firearm trafficking.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez listens

Did AOC’s Questions on Trump’s Real Estate Valuations Unlock His Tax Returns?

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez grilled Michael Cohen on the real estate dealings of Donald Trump. Cohen’s replies may open access to Trump's elusive tax returns.

a rendering of a dog park in Chicago's Lincoln Yards

Are Dog Parks Exclusionary?

In Chicago and other cities, the demand for pet-friendly public space has boomed. But many communities see off-leash parks as heralds of gentrification.

a photo of Los Angeles

The State of Census 2020 Is Distrust

Across political persuasions, a majority of Americans are convinced that adding a citizen question will render the 2020 census inaccurate.

A photo of a design maquette for the Obama Presidential Center planned for Jackson Park and designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.

Why the Case Against the Obama Presidential Center Is So Important

A judge has ruled that a lawsuit brought by Chicago preservationists can proceed, dealing a blow to Barack Obama's plans to build his library in Jackson Park.

Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

Protestors hold a sign that reads "Respect Democracy Our Vote Matters"

The Conservative Backlash Against Progressive Ballot Measures

In many states, ballot initiatives on expanding Medicaid, limiting gerrymandering, and raising the minimum wage swept to victory in November. Now lawmakers are doing their best to reverse them.