Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps is a staff writer for CityLab covering housing, architecture, and politics. He previously worked as a senior editor for Architect magazine.

A Milwaukee household getting evicted.

How 'Evicted' Became an Exhibit

The National Building Museum brings Matthew Desmond’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book—and the American housing crisis itself—to life.

Understanding the Great Connecticut Taxpocalypse

The state relies on property taxes, and after the GOP tax bill, many fear that housing values will stagnate or crash.

August Wilson's Enduring Drama on Urban Renewal

Two Trains Running shows the costs and conflict of racist planning policies from a profoundly human perspective.

A Brief History of Donald Trump's War on Welfare

By imposing work requirements, the president is escalating his decades-long campaign against government aid.

How the Fair Housing Act Failed Black Homeowners

In cities like Jacksonville and St. Louis, maps of mortgage approvals and home values in black neighborhoods look the same as they did decades ago, before the passage of the landmark fair housing law.

A Tale of Two Beantowns

Houston is creeping on Chicago's population, pennants, and now, public art. But Chicago has at least one thing Houston still lacks.

Mapping the Threat of a Census Disaster in 2020

The GOP seems to be betting that damage from a major undercount will be isolated to Democratic-leaning cities. But it’s not that simple.

Census Report Found 'Unprecedented' Fears About Privacy Last Year

Concerns about confidentiality and immigration status were discovered months before the Department of Justice asked to add a question about citizenship.  

The Census Will Add a Citizenship Question. What Happens Next?

Critics fear that the change will discourage immigrant participation in the 2020 count and lead to undercounting.

The Spending Bill's Biggest Winners: Housing and Transit

The White House proposed dramatic budget cuts for housing, transit, and food aid. Instead, the omnibus delivers extra spending.

In Houston, HUD Assailed for 'Government-Sponsored Segregation'

Advocates in Texas are charging the department with rolling back fair housing laws.

The Austin Bombings Were Terrifying. But Were They 'Terrorism'?

Absent a motive, the serial bombing attacks in Texas hadn’t been labeled with the term. Now, police say the suspect has been killed.

The Latest Supervillain Attacking Batgirl's Gotham City: Gentrification

Batgirl author Hope Larson talks about the changing face of Burnside, Gotham City's Brooklyn, where tech incubators and housing affordability are bigger threats than even the Penguin and Harley Quinn.

Will Nashville Still Be a 'City on the Rise' Now That It Lost Its Rising Star Mayor?

Before she resigned over a sex scandal this week, Megan Barry had facilitated one of the one of the boldest municipal transit plans in recent memory. It remains to be seen what will become of her still-tentative imprint on the city and region.

Trump's Tariffs Dim the Prospects for Trump's Wall

In a protectionist double-whammy, tariffs will make steel for infrastructure more expensive, while a crackdown on waivers will make U.S. steel mandatory.

Businesses Spurn the NRA. Where Are the Mayors?

For the most part, mayors of potential NRA host cities haven’t shown the same resistance as a growing number of private companies.

Former Census Bureau Director John Thompson, pictured during his Senate confirmation hearing in 2013.

Ex-Census Director: Citizenship Question Is 'a Tremendous Risk'

The bureau’s former boss explains why adding a question about U.S. citizenship to the 2020 count would be a big mistake.

Food Aid Doesn't Cover the Price of Food in Almost Every County in America

A new map shows that SNAP benefits lag behind need, even as the GOP mulls different ways to cut back on food aid.

Dallas Politico to NRA: Don't Bring Your Guns to Town

The city agreed to waive convention center rental fees to the gun rights group for their annual convention in May. Now one city council member has raised an objection.

Why Reform SNAP? Food Aid Is Working

There’s no better tool in the federal government’s anti-poverty arsenal.

A Brief Guide to 'Social Impact Partnerships'

The GOP-led Congress just paved the way for a novel public-private partnership model. But it's not the usual Trump-era legislation.