Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps is a staff writer for CityLab covering housing, architecture, and politics. He previously worked as a senior editor for Architect magazine.

A portrait of architect Phil Freelon sitting in front of a wall covered with design renderings.

Remembering Phil Freelon, Architect of the Black Experience

The lead architect of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, among many other important cultural buildings, has died at 66.

Andrew Yang Wants to Save Your Dying Mall

The Democratic presidential candidate wants to fight suburban blight by repurposing dying retail centers.

a photo collage of 2020 presidential candidates.

Will Housing Swing the 2020 Election?

Among Democratic candidates for president, the politics of America’s housing affordability crisis are getting complicated. Just wait until Trump barges in.

a photo of a group of tenants at a press conference in New York City

Inside New York's Landmark Deal to Protect Renters

The state will boast the “strongest tenant protections in history.” But critics in the real estate industry warn that the bill could backfire.

The Secrets to NYC Parks’ New Signs

Over the last five years, NYC Parks has very gradually introduced a new brand identity, including streamlined signs visible at most parks today.

a photo of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross

Where a Census Undercount Will Hurt (or Help) Most

A 2020 Census that favors white and Republican-leaning districts—and undercounts younger, lower income, and black and Hispanic residents—seems ever more likely.  

a photo of a woman going to a Wells Fargo branch

Wells Fargo to Donate $1 Billion for Affordable Housing

Three unnamed cities are on a shortlist to score a philanthropic windfall from the Wells Fargo Foundation, the scandal-plagued megabank’s charitable arm.

a photo of presidential hopeful Cory Booker speaking at a campaign event in New Hampshire.

Why Cory Booker Is Focusing on Affordable Housing

A monthly tax credit for low-income renters and a “baby bond” program to help first-time homebuyers are part of the presidential hopeful’s list of proposals.

a photo of the Internal Revenue Service building.

Is This the Universal Basic Income That Americans Will Buy?

A new proposal for a Universal Earned Income Tax Credit could unlock the poverty-fighting powers of no-strings-attached money.

Childhood Asthma: A Lingering Effect of Redlining

New research shows that disparities in housing contribute to disparities in one of the most common chronic diseases afflicting children.

Corporations Are Getting Better at Gutting Worker Protections

Thanks to a recent Supreme Court ruling, more and more companies are using forced arbitration to undermine state and local labor laws.

Opponents of SB 50.

The Push for Denser Zoning Is Here to Stay

Residential “upzoning” policies being adopted from Minneapolis to Seattle were once politically out of the question. Now they’re just politically fraught.

The Problem With D.C.’s New Apple Store

The city has converted a cultural gem entrusted to the entire city into an exclusive outlet that serves only the few.

The Manhattan skyline at night.

Can New York Make Buildings Super-Efficient, Fast?

By 2030, the city’s large buildings must cut their carbon emissions by 40 percent. Here’s how that can happen.

What the Supreme Court Said About the 2020 Census Citizenship Question

In oral arguments, conservative justices asked about data science, while liberals asked what the citizenship question was really for.

Maria Romano stands behind one of her three children, Jennifer, 10, as she gets something to eat in their Harlem apartment in New York Thursday, June 3, 2005

Why HUD Wants to Restrict Assistance for Immigrants

A proposal by Ben Carson’s agency would eject immigrant families from public housing to make way for the "most vulnerable." Housing advocates aren't buying it.

When Tech Makes Food Insecurity Worse

Two UX designers are making art based on a shared frustration: Government tech ideas that don’t incorporate people into the process.

A photo of the Notre-Dame Cathedral fire in Paris.

Amid Notre-Dame’s Destruction, There’s Hope for Restoration

Flames consumed the roof and spire of the 13th-century cathedral in Paris. The good news: Gothic architecture is built to handle this kind of disaster.

A photo of an IRS tax examiner protesting outside his office during the partial government shutdown in January.

The Progressives Making the Case for Monthly Tax Refunds

Expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit to include people without kids or traditional jobs would be a powerful poverty-fighting tool, says a growing coalition of Democrats.

The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.