Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps is a staff writer for CityLab covering housing, architecture, and politics. He previously worked as a senior editor for Architect magazine.

a photo of Housing Secretary Ben Carson in Baltimore in July.

How HUD Could Dismantle a Pillar of Civil Rights Law

The Department of Housing and Urban Development plans to revise the “disparate impact” rule, which could fundamentally reshape federal fair housing enforcement.  

a photo of Tom's Diner in Denver

Who Owns Tom’s Diner: Tom or Denver?

The owner of Tom’s Diner, a beloved local coffee shop, wants to sell to developers, but fans want to save his 1967 Googie building. Is there a win-win here?

a photo of a low-income apartment complex in Charleston, South Carolina.

How a Section 8 Experiment Could Reveal a Better Way to Escape Poverty

A low-cost program created by Raj Chetty’s Opportunity Insights research group shows dramatic improvements in social mobility for low-income families in Seattle.

a photo of construction on a home in Des Moines, Iowa

With Zoning Change, Des Moines Hopes to Lure Suburbanites

In Des Moines, Iowa, zoning rules regulating lot size, housing styles, and building materials will make new homes too expensive, builders warn.

A photo of a child playing on the rocks under the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn.

Study: No Link Between Gentrification and Displacement in NYC

Using Medicaid data, researchers found that most low-income children in the city’s gentrifying neighborhoods stayed, even as affluent newcomers moved in.

Can Pete Buttigieg Fix America's Vacancy Problem?

The Democratic presidential candidate’s plan to promote homeownership simultaneously addresses hypervacancy and the racial wealth gap.

CityLab Daily: Food Aid Is at Risk for Millions of Americans

Also: Some good news for Europe’s car bans, and a city decides to make new land.

a photo of the First Pasadena State Bank building, designed by Texas modernist architects MacKie and Kamrath. It will be demolished on July 21.

The Lonely Death of a South Texas Skyscraper

The First Pasadena State Bank, a 12-story modernist tower inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright, has dominated this small town near Houston since 1962.

A photo of anti-gentrification graffiti in Washington, D.C.

The Hidden Winners in Neighborhood Gentrification

A new study claims the effects of neighborhood change on original lower-income residents are largely positive, despite fears of spiking rents and displacement.

A First-Rate Waterfront Park Is Transforming a Historic Greek City

Thessaloniki’s New Waterfront is the centerpiece in an effort to transform the local economy, and other cities are taking notice.

A Last-Gasp Census Conspiracy to Save the Citizenship Question

Fact check: No, President Obama did not remove a citizenship question from the census while he was in office.

A portrait of architect Phil Freelon sitting in front of a wall covered with design renderings.

Remembering Phil Freelon, Architect of the Black Experience

The lead architect of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, among many other important cultural buildings, has died at 66.

Andrew Yang Wants to Save Your Dying Mall

The Democratic presidential candidate wants to fight suburban blight by repurposing dying retail centers.

a photo collage of 2020 presidential candidates.

Will Housing Swing the 2020 Election?

Among Democratic candidates for president, the politics of America’s housing affordability crisis are getting complicated. Just wait until Trump barges in.

a photo of a group of tenants at a press conference in New York City

Inside New York's Landmark Deal to Protect Renters

The state will boast the “strongest tenant protections in history.” But critics in the real estate industry warn that the bill could backfire.

The Secrets to NYC Parks’ New Signs

Over the last five years, NYC Parks has very gradually introduced a new brand identity, including streamlined signs visible at most parks today.

a photo of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross

Where a Census Undercount Will Hurt (or Help) Most

A 2020 Census that favors white and Republican-leaning districts—and undercounts younger, lower income, and black and Hispanic residents—seems ever more likely.  

a photo of a woman going to a Wells Fargo branch

Wells Fargo to Donate $1 Billion for Affordable Housing

Three unnamed cities are on a shortlist to score a philanthropic windfall from the Wells Fargo Foundation, the scandal-plagued megabank’s charitable arm.

a photo of presidential hopeful Cory Booker speaking at a campaign event in New Hampshire.

Why Cory Booker Is Focusing on Affordable Housing

A monthly tax credit for low-income renters and a “baby bond” program to help first-time homebuyers are part of the presidential hopeful’s list of proposals.

a photo of the Internal Revenue Service building.

Is This the Universal Basic Income That Americans Will Buy?

A new proposal for a Universal Earned Income Tax Credit could unlock the poverty-fighting powers of no-strings-attached money.