Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps

Kriston Capps is a staff writer for CityLab covering housing, architecture, and politics. He previously worked as a senior editor for Architect magazine.

What the Hell: Why Not Rename Austin?

A report about city-owned streets named after the Confederacy has sparked a broader (and misleading) conversation about Austin’s history.

Do Millennials Prefer Cities or Suburbs? Maybe Both.

A new simulation may shed light on the living preferences of the largest generation in American history.

Never (Baby) Trump

How do you make light of something that isn’t funny anymore?

Here's a New Thing to Worry About: Census Hackers

Why national security experts want some answers as the Census Bureau prepares for its first electronic count in 2020.

The ‘War on Poverty’ Isn’t Over, and Kids Are Losing

Federal spending on America’s children is heading down, and the drop in funding could be dramatic.

Concrete letters spell "zoo" at the entrance to the National Zoo in Washington

The National Zoo Shouldn’t Fall for Security Theater

A proposal to ramp up security at the National Zoo would undermine a historic design that weaves nature into the lives of Washingtonians.

Down With Fun!

“Fun House,” an installation by Snarkitecture at the National Building Museum, shows that the craze for crowd-friendly museum spectacles is still going strong.

What If the Teen City Council Is Better Than the Grownup One?

These high schoolers take their local government very seriously.

With Justice Kennedy’s Retirement, Fair Housing Is in Peril

The Supreme Court’s swing vote on the 2015 “disparate impact” case shored up the Fair Housing Act.

Why Vermonters Fear This Mormon Utopia

The National Trust for Historic Preservation’s latest list of America’s most endangered historic places includes four Vermont towns set to host a vast micro-housing development based of the visions of Joseph Smith.

Here’s D.C.’s Memorial For Native American Veterans

Unlike other war memorials in D.C., the National Native American Veterans Memorial does not highlight a specific conflict, but rather an entire people.

Why Trump Wants a Department of Public Welfare

A sweeping plan to reform the federal government could be considered an effort to undo the New Deal with a single org chart.

How HUD Could Reverse Course on Racial Discrimination

The housing agency plans to revisit its rule regarding “disparate impact,” a legal doctrine that prohibits discrimination that happens because of a policy whose language is otherwise neutral.

D.C. Voted on Higher Wages for Tipped Workers. Here’s What Happened.

Support for the controversial ballot measure, which will raise the minimum wage on tipped employees, fell on familiar race and class lines.

D.C.’s War Over Restaurant Tips Will Soon Go National

The District’s voters will decide Initiative 77, which would raise the minimum wage on tipped employees. Why don’t workers support it?

Equipped with a VR headset, a viewer of "Carne y Arena" experiences the film inside a cavernous room full of sand.

The Experience Is Virtual. The Terror Is Real.

Director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s new VR film recreates the experience of crossing the U.S. border.

This Is the Last Straw

It’s time to crack down on single-use plastic drinking utensils, the world’s most disposable product.

The newsroom of the Philadelphia Inquirer, in 2009, when the owners filed for bankruptcy.

The Hidden Costs of Losing Your City's Newspaper

Without watchdogs, government costs go up, according to new research.

LOVE sculpture in a center city.

Who Owns LOVE?

Just days before Robert Indiana’s death, an offshore shell company filed a copyright suit against him over his beloved public artwork.

A man sleeps in a doorway in downtown Portland, Ore., on Sept. 19, 2017.

A Healthcare Giant Enters the Battle for Cheaper Housing

Kaiser Permanente is pledging $200 million toward fighting homelessness and building more low-cost housing in eight states, plus D.C.