Laura Bliss

Laura Bliss

Laura Bliss is a staff writer at CityLab, covering transportation, infrastructure, and the environment. She also authors MapLab, a biweekly newsletter about maps that reveal and shape urban spaces (subscribe here). Her work has appeared in the New York Times, The Atlantic, Los Angeles, GOOD, L.A. Review of Books, and beyond.

When Living Near Transit Doesn't Lower Transportation Costs

A new study that tracks a decade of real family expenses calls into question a fundamental assumption of affordability research.

MapLab: The Cartography of Chaos

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Lyft Delivers Carbon-Neutral Rides

The ride-hailing company announced on Thursday that it plans to become one of the largest voluntary purchasers of carbon offsets in the world.

Seven diners gathered at the home of Veronica Perez, center, on Tuesday night in downtown L.A.

What Happens When 1,000 Strangers Talk Race In L.A.?

Angelenos gathered at 100 dinners this week through a city-backed initiative to spark civic and civil dialogue.

A man rides a motorized scooter as he approaches Market Street in San Francisco, Tuesday, April 17, 2018.

The Electric Scooter War Is No Joke

As Bird, LimeBike, and Spin unleash dockless scooters in new cities, turf battles are breaking out.

It's Time to Regulate 'Smart City' Technology, Too

This isn’t just about Facebook: When Google is building cities and cars are turning into data-harvesting machines, the need for laws that protect users has never been more urgent.

MapLab: Airports In Abstraction

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Uber Pivots to On-Demand Everything

The company is announcing new partnerships with dockless bike firms, car-sharing services, and transit startups, signaling its desire to help cities service all types of mobility.

Who Expects Car Companies to Willingly Go Green?

The industry may cultivate an eco-minded image, but its lobbying efforts can tell a different story. Where should citizens place their outrage?

The 'Transit-Oriented Teens' Are Coming to Save Your City

The 62,000 members of this urbanist Facebook group are doing more than just making weird memes. (But they are making a lot of weird memes.)

MapLab: The High Stakes of Census 2020

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Elaine Herzberg was struck by an autonomous Uber vehicle on March 18 in Tempe, AZ.

Former Uber Backup Driver: 'We Saw This Coming'

Before the fatal crash in Tempe, Uber’s self-driving test program had safety weaknesses, ex-employees say. Some weren’t avoidable, technologists believe, but some might have been.

Brooklyn Is Booming. So Why Is It Shrinking?

In 2017, New York City’s largest borough lost about 2,000 people, the first net loss since 2010.

A vehicle goes by the scene of Sunday's fatality where a pedestrian was stuck by an Uber vehicle in autonomous mode, in Tempe, Arizona.

Fatal Uber Crash Raises Red Flags About Self-Driving Safety

After a woman in Tempe was killed by a self-driving Uber, local law enforcement was quick to absolve the company of blame. Transportation experts aren’t so sure.

The First Pedestrian Has Been Killed by a Self-Driving Car. Now What?

In Tempe, Arizona, an autonomous Uber struck and killed a woman crossing a street at night. The incident is likely to test the public’s tolerance of AVs on real-world roads.

An 'Instant Bridge' Collapses Near Miami, and Many Questions Remain

Florida International University’s new pedestrian bridge was state-of-the-art. On Thursday, the new span failed, killing six.

MapLab: When Women Map the World

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Amazon Go Might Kill More Than Just Supermarkets

Supermarkets are community anchors. Amazon’s “just walk out” version embodies a disconcerting social transformation.

Design for an accessory dwelling unit in Portland, Oregon

Portland's 'Granny Flats' Get an Affordable Boost

A new startup pays the upfront cost of a backyard dwelling in exchange for some of the rent it generates.

'Stop Killing Kids,' Traffic Safety Advocates Protest

A march in New York City on Monday draws inspiration from the 1970s social movement that changed Dutch street design for good.

The Ticking Time Bomb for Suburban Retail

Lightning-speed deliveries and autonomous cars could accelerate the current big-box implosion.