Linda Poon

Madison McVeigh/CityLab

The Balancing Act of Learning to Bike as an Adult

I’m 26 and I can’t ride a bike, so I’m starting at step one.

Van Alen Institue

Designing for More Effective Protests

A flash competition in New York City asks designers to come up with way to make protests stand out as they become more frequent.

Sound Transit/YouTube

The World's First Floating Light Rail

Seattle built some of the longest highway bridges that float on water. Soon, one of them will carry a train system, too.

Good Medicine Picture Company

Bringing 1940s Chinatown Back to Life in Miniature

Frank Wong’s memories of San Francisco are fading, so to preserve them, the 82-year-old artist recreates them in three dimensions.

Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters

Putting Sustainable Development Under a Microscope

Even in countries that have made a lot of progress, measuring sustainable development at the neighborhood level exposes the inequality within cities.

Proterra

Reno's Road to the Future of Autonomous Buses

Electric bus company Proterra is teaming up with the University of Nevada, Reno, to see how cities can communicate with driverless public transit.

Ford Motor Co.

Bridj Collapses After Just 3 Years

The bus company trying to bridge public transit with ride-hailing shuts down after failing to secure new investment.

Robert Nickelsberg/Getty

The Lawsuits Over NYC's Subway Inaccessibility Are Long Overdue

Advocates allege that the entire MTA system discriminates against riders with disabilities.

Esri

Mapping Where the Lights Are Brighter, And Where They're Going Dark

In four short years, urbanization, economics, and war have changed a satellite’s view of the Earth at night.

Athit Perawongmetha/Reuters

Bangkok's Street Vendors Are Not the Enemies of Public Space

Yet the Thai government has long been on a mission to “clean up” the streets and “return the pavements to the pedestrians.”

Edgar Su/Reuters

Singapore, City of Sensors

They’re on buses, atop buildings, in parks, and inside drains as part of the island’s vision to become the world’s first “Smart Nation.” But what do they mean for privacy?

Worldwide: Mapping Urbanization/Courtesy of DigitalLab

A Better Way to Map Humanity's Spread Around the Earth

Nighttime maps show where people have settled and built, but they miss a lot, too. A new campaign is turning to the crowd to identify where people move as the world population grows.

Mike Blake/Reuters

Uber Wants to Get More People in Electric Cars

Starting in Portland.

Hyperloop One

Should the Hyperloop Be for Cities or Suburbia?

One company is making progress on the technology, but where it ends up is an open question.

Jim Mone/AP

In a Twist, Kentucky's Coal Museum Will Now Be Powered By Solar

The move will save the museum $8,000 to $10,000 a year in energy costs.

LHS/AP

Rebuilding the 'Kingdom of Bicycles'

Two decades ago, China pushed bikes aside to advance its car-centric ambitions. Now it’s regretting that move—and betting on bike share to making cycling cool again.

Axon/Taser International

Taser Aims to Bring Free Body Cams to U.S. Police

The stun-gun makers are offering body cameras and data storage for one year to departments nationwide. But before police departments jump at the offer, they should be mindful of the hidden costs of acquiring new technology.

Ricardo Moraes/Reuters

To Build a Great Public Space, You Need More Than Good Design

In low-income neighborhoods, even the best-designed parks and community centers go to waste if no one uses them. The nonprofit Kounkuey Design Initiative is taking that challenge head-on.