Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is an assistant editor at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

How One City Kickstarted the Ozone’s Recovery

In 1987, two dozen countries agreed to take steps to protect the atmosphere. For Irvine, California, that wasn't enough.

A photo of people comforting each other after a mass shooting at a bar in Thousand Oaks, California.

The Thousand Oaks Shooting and the Geography of American Gun Violence

A gunman killed at least 12 people in a California suburb known as one of the safest cities in the U.S.  

The City Leaders Who Reached Higher Office in 2018

The midterm elections saw a handful of mayors and city councillors win seats in Congress and statewide offices.

‘Environmentalist’ Doesn’t Just Mean White and Wealthy

A new study refutes some common stereotypes of who cares most about the environment.

Taipei’s Mayor Will Destroy You With His New Rap Video

Mayor Ko Wen-je just dropped a trap song with one simple message: “Do things right.”

Local governments are using smart speakers like Amazon's Alexa to answer basic questions about the city.

Have a Question About Your City? Ask Alexa

As smart speakers grow in popularity, cities see them as an easy way to connect people to services and information.

Reconstructing Hurricane Harvey to Find Its Overlooked Victims

Will Houston’s data-driven approach help it distribute recovery funds more fairly?

Leana Wen stands in the emergency department at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, during her medical residency.

Leana Wen Takes Her Fight for Women’s Health National

Baltimore City’s health commissioner leaves her post Friday to become president of Planned Parenthood, and she’s bringing her relentless work ethic along with her.

High waves triggered by Typhoon Jebi are seen at a fishing port in western Japan.

Climate Change Is Testing Asia’s Megacities

Even the largest, most advanced cities are vulnerable to the intensifying storms in the Pacific Ocean.

First Came the Hurricane. Now Come the Mosquitoes.

Heavy rains and flooding create ideal conditions for swarms. For public health officials, the focus is on curbing the potential for viruses to spread.

‘Startup in Residence' Builds a Bridge Between Tech and City Hall

A four-month program that started in San Francisco is now helping entrepreneurs across the nation tap into the $400 billion gov-tech industry.

Why Uber and Lyft Really Want You to Stop Driving

Uber is committing $10 million to support sustainable mobility, and Lyft is expanding its "Ditch Your Car" challenge. Is that enough?

The Parks Where Kids (and Their Parents) Walk and Read at the Same Time

Some libraries are getting young kids reading by taking the books outside.

Remembering the ‘Mother of All Pandemics,’ 100 Years Later

The Spanish flu outbreak of 1918 offers important lessons in balancing truth and panic during public health crises.

Construction site of Athletes' Village for Tokyo 2020 Olympic games.

What Will It Take to Make Buildings Carbon Neutral?

Last month, 19 cities signed a declaration to make all new buildings carbon neutral by 2030. So what happens next?

The App That Pays You to Find a Smarter Commute

Incentrip rewards users for finding greener, more efficient ways to get to work. But can it get people to change their habits?

New York Public Library Brings Literary Classics to Instagram

The whimsical Insta Novels program wants you to reconsider the roles of libraries and social media.

Cooling Dallas’s Concrete Jungle

Using GIS technology, three environmental organizations are teaming up with residents to plant 1,000 trees in areas that need it most.

Science Tackles the ‘Right Hook,’ Biking’s Most-Feared Crash

Toronto researchers used eye-tracking devices to determine whether motorists were looking for bicycles when they turned right. Most weren’t.

A South Korean woman with a baby in her arms in front of Seoul City Hall in 2005.

South Korea Is Trying to Boost its Birth Rate. It's Not Working.

The country needs to convince more couples to have children. But its biggest city is no paradise for parents.

An urban garden for collecting stormwater runoff.

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green

A new study finds turning vacant lots into green space can improve the mental health of residents in the hardest-hit neighborhoods.