Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is an assistant editor at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

An Unlikely Pairing of Sustainable Development and Hip Hop

Eight entrepreneurs and eight rappers try to sell the world on the UN’s environmental agenda through rap battles.

Can China Support Its (Eventual) Ban on Gas Cars?

Electric vehicles might be the future, but the country’s infrastructure has a long way to go before it can charge them.

A wheelchair user is pictured in front of protest signs about accessibility.

Google Gets Serious About Mapping Wheelchair Accessibility

The tech giant is tapping into its global army of users to make its Maps app more useful for people with disabilities.

Chicago's Path to Become a 'City of Learning'

Four years after launching a digital platform to connect students with out-of-school programs, researchers are reaping the benefits: a large pool of data to study the inequity of informal education.

What Makes a Smart City Truly Smart?

Kansas City has streetlights equipped with sensors and plans to make roads pay for themselves. But its chief innovation officer says there’s nothing smart about them.

The Twists and Turns of Making a Neon Sign

Over a century, the trend has come and gone—and come back again. But the technique has stayed the same.

L.A. County’s Latest Solution to Homelessness Is a Test of Compassion

Residents can get up to $75,000 to build a “granny flat”—if they open it up to a homeless family.

Skyscrapers tower over Singapore's historic Chinatown.

How Do You Measure the Value of a Historic Site?

Debates over historic preservation often run into a problem: There’s plenty of data to support economic arguments, and much less to address questions of cultural value. A research team in Singapore wants to change that.

An illustration of rats is pictured.

Will Cities Ever Outsmart Rats?

The age-old strategy is “see a rat, kill a rat.” The new plan is to end an infestation before it ever begins.

A real estate agent shows a Seattle home for sale to her client from Beijing.

The Chinese Pursuit of the American Dream

Chinese citizens are the top foreign buyers of homes in the U.S. As Beijing cracks down on money going abroad, will America’s real estate market feel the impact?

To Bounce Back From Disaster, Balance Is Key

A new book draws recovery lessons from recent natural and man-made calamities.

The researchers' map shows how neighborhoods in five cities have physically changed between 2007 and 2014.

What Artificial Intelligence Reveals About Urban Change

A team of Harvard and MIT researchers takes a new approach to figure out why some neighborhoods improve while others decline.

Helping Boomers Find Millennial Roommates

In a college town, students and older homeowners have a lot to offer each other. That’s why two urban planners built an app to bring them together.

Michael Bloomberg speaks at the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Bloomberg's $200 Million Challenge to Cities

The latest rendition of the competition asks cities to come up with innovations that can move the entire nation forward.

Where Tomorrow's Floods Will Come

Extreme rainfall events like Tropical Storm Cindy are becoming more common. But development on inland flood zones hasn’t slowed down.

Remembering Beaches as Battlegrounds for Civil Rights

In 1960, black protesters in Biloxi, Mississippi, were attacked while demanding equal access to public beaches. Now the remaining activists are working to preserve the history of the “wade-ins” that opened the space to everyone.

A Look Inside Nepal's Abandoned Railway to India

Villagers in Janakpur are anticipating the return of a colonial-era train route that’s considered their lifeline—but progress has been slow.

In this black-and-white photograph, men appear to smoke opium on top of couches and benches.

Opium Dens Are a Terrible Theme for Bars

The anti-immigrant history behind these spaces should make you reconsider casting the stereotypical drug den as the inspiration for a lounge.

An illustration of a young woman riding a bike with her feet off the pedals

The Balancing Act of Learning to Bike as an Adult

I’m 26 and I can’t ride a bike, so I’m starting at step one.

Designing for More Effective Protests

A flash competition in New York City asks designers to come up with way to make protests stand out as they become more frequent.

The World's First Floating Light Rail

Seattle built some of the longest highway bridges that float on water. Soon, one of them will carry a train system, too.