Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is a staff writer at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

What Bigotry Looks Like During Social Distancing

As reports of harassment and assault against Asian Americans increase, community advocates are finding new ways to tackle the spread of xenophobia.

The Great Global Child Care Crisis

What's a parent to do when all of the schools and daycares suddenly close? For some workers in some places, options are starting to emerge.

Coronavirus Exposes How Bad America’s Homework Gap Really Is

With almost 44 million American kids out of school, teachers want to turn to online learning — but not everyone can log on.

photo: Revelers at New York City's St. Patrick's Day parade in 2010.

Parades and Pandemics Are a Really Bad Combination

Coronavirus fears finally halted New York City’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Here’s why health experts are urging cities to cancel all public gatherings.

San Francisco is using RVs as temporary housing during the coronavirus outbreak.

RVs and an Econolodge Become Makeshift Quarantine Zones

As Covid-19 cases climb, cities may face a shortage of locations to quarantine and isolate people. In the U.S., it’s a uniquely local problem.

Calling Out the Super Polluters

Just 100 industrial facilities are to blame for more than a third of U.S. toxic air emissions. A new report ranks the biggest offenders.

There Are Far More Americans Without Broadband Access than Previously Thought

The Federal Communications Commission says 21 million Americans lack high-speed internet access, but a new report says the actual figure is double that.

Where Light Pollution Is Seeping Into the Rural Night Sky

Artificial light that floods the night sky is thought to be only an urban phenomenon. But when you adjust for population, the picture is dramatically different.

Where America's Climate Migrants Will Go As Sea Level Rises

13 million U.S. coastal residents are expected to be displaced by 2100 due to sea level rise. Researchers are starting to predict where they’ll go.

Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

Housing Discrimination Made Summers Even Hotter

The practice of redlining in the 1930s helps explain why poorer U.S. neighborhoods experience more extreme heat.

photo: a couple in a Christmas market.

Why Do Christmas Movies Hate Cities So Much?

The typical plots of holiday rom-coms involve women finding love in a make-believe small town—and getting out of the cruel big city.

New York City Unveils a Next-Generation Trash Can

The winner of the BetterBin design competition is easier for sanitation workers to lift and deters bulk trash-dumpers. It could replace the ubiquitous green litter basket.

New York City Will Require Bird-Friendly Glass on Buildings

Hundreds of thousands of migratory birds smash into the city’s buildings every year. The city council just passed a bill to cut back on the carnage.

photo:  At the Standing Rock Indian Health Service in Fort Yates, North Dakota, Dr. Lynelle Noisy Hawk examines a patient

How ‘Indian Relocation’ Created a Public Health Crisis

Melissa Walls of the Center for American Indian Health in Duluth, Minnesota, talks about the lasting health effects of “Indian Relocation” policies of the 1950s.

When Cities Don’t Accept Cash for Public Services

This year saw a wave of backlash against cashless retail, but what about when cities like Washington, D.C., want to move toward all-digital payments?

Turkeys in Your Neighborhood? Get Used to It.

Wild turkeys have made a remarkable comeback in the U.S. since the early 20th century, leading to more reports of them causing trouble in the neighborhood.

photo: An array of solar panels in Oakland, California.

When Residents Support Solar—Just ‘Not in My Backyard’

While the American public broadly favors expanding renewable energy, that support doesn’t always extend to the photovoltaic panels next door.

Smashing the Great Pumpkin-Waste Problem

Community pumpkin-smashing events aim to cut down on Halloween’s contribution to America’s food waste problem and reap the benefits of composting.

How to See Fall Colors Without a Car

Americans often hit the road to see fall foliage, but it can be difficult to take the same trip without a car. These places make it a little easier.