Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is an assistant editor at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

The Parks Where Kids (and Their Parents) Walk and Read at the Same Time

Some libraries are getting young kids reading by taking the books outside.

Remembering the ‘Mother of All Pandemics,’ 100 Years Later

The Spanish flu outbreak of 1918 offers important lessons in balancing truth and panic during public health crises.

Construction site of Athletes' Village for Tokyo 2020 Olympic games.

What Will It Take to Make Buildings Carbon Neutral?

Last month, 19 cities signed a declaration to make all new buildings carbon neutral by 2030. So what happens next?

The App That Pays You to Find a Smarter Commute

Incentrip rewards users for finding greener, more efficient ways to get to work. But can it get people to change their habits?

New York Public Library Brings Literary Classics to Instagram

The whimsical Insta Novels program wants you to reconsider the roles of libraries and social media.

Cooling Dallas’s Concrete Jungle

Using GIS technology, three environmental organizations are teaming up with residents to plant 1,000 trees in areas that need it most.

Science Tackles the ‘Right Hook,’ Biking’s Most-Feared Crash

Toronto researchers used eye-tracking devices to determine whether motorists were looking for bicycles when they turned right. Most weren’t.

A South Korean woman with a baby in her arms in front of Seoul City Hall in 2005.

South Korea Is Trying to Boost its Birth Rate. It's Not Working.

The country needs to convince more couples to have children. But its biggest city is no paradise for parents.

An urban garden for collecting stormwater runoff.

The Healing Potential of Turning Vacant Lots Green

A new study finds turning vacant lots into green space can improve the mental health of residents in the hardest-hit neighborhoods.

Don’t Throw It Away—Take It to the Repair Cafe

This series of workshops aims to keep broken items out of the landfill, and it might help you save a few bucks, too.

To Better Predict Traffic, Look to the Electric Grid

The way we consume power after midnight can reveal how we bad the morning rush hour will be.

Facing Wildfire Threats, Cities Ditch Fireworks for Drones on July 4th

Can the high-tech alternative deliver the same kind of boom?

Japan's Hello Kitty Bullet Train Is Way Too Cute

It’s a dream come true for some, and a big part of the country’s embrace of “kawaii” culture.

A screen shot from the game 'Bus Simulator 18'

The Mundane Joys of Playing a Bus Simulator

In Bus Simulator 18, you’ll pick up passengers, dodge potholes, and avoid bankruptcy. Too real?

A photo of high-rises in Songdo, billed as the world's "smartest" city.

Sleepy in Songdo, Korea’s Smartest City

The hardest thing about living in an eco-friendly master-planned utopia? Meeting your neighbors.  

Why Do Cities Want Their Own Cryptocurrencies?

The allure of digital currencies has hit Dubai, Seoul, Berkeley, and more. What looks like another offshoot of the Bitcoin craze could be an evolution of the municipal bond.

Lessons From the Raccoon That Scaled a Skyscraper

The critter that climbed a 25-story building in St. Paul, Minnesota, is a reminder: We could design for cohabitation between humans and urban wildlife.

A photo illustration shows a homeless encampment in Seattle.

The Tech That’s Changing How Cities Help the Homeless

From mapping apps to the blockchain, new tools are intended to give cities the information they need to address this growing challenge.

A High-Tech City Shows Its Human Side

We’re in Seoul, looking for the people who make South Korea’s fast-paced capital run.

The Chinese city of Shenzhen's 16,000-strong bus fleet is now battery powered.

How China Took Charge of the Electric Bus Revolution

In just eight years, Shenzhen became the first city to electrify 100 percent of its public buses—16,359, to be exact.

America, Land of the Young and Lonely

A survey suggests young adults belong to the loneliness generation—but experts say it’s too early to call it an epidemic.