Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is a staff writer at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

Smashing the Great Pumpkin-Waste Problem

Community pumpkin-smashing events aim to cut down on Halloween’s contribution to America’s food waste problem and reap the benefits of composting.

How to See Fall Colors Without a Car

Americans often hit the road to see fall foliage, but it can be difficult to take the same trip without a car. These places make it a little easier.

a photo of the Florida youth engagement initiative TEMPO

When Resilience Starts With the City’s Most Vulnerable Youth

A violence-prevention initiative in Tallahassee is also training low-income youth for jobs that contribute to the city’s climate adaptation plan.

Carbon Emissions Are Already Falling in 30 Cities

As mayors gather for C40’s summit on climate change, the coalition reports that a third of its members have hit peak emissions.

Photo of a public library.

Why Libraries Are Eliminating Late Fees for Overdue Books

Chicago Public Library became the largest system to eliminate late fees, a move that will increase access for low-income families. Will more libraries follow?

The Storm of the Century Could Soon Happen Every Year

A UN report warns extreme weather events that historically happened about once in 100 years could hit coastal cities yearly by 2050. Cities need to prepare now.

Squirrels Speak Bird

The skittish rodents are always listening for cues that tell them if they’re safe or not—including to the sounds of their avian friends.

Mapping the Changing Colors of Fall Across the U.S.

Much of the country won’t see those vibrant oranges and reds until mid-October, which leaves plenty of time for leaf peepers to plan their autumn road trips.

As Flooding Worsens, Home Buyouts Move at a Snail's Pace

A new report finds that it typically takes five years or longer to complete the buyout process, leaving homeowners of flooded properties in limbo.

a photo of volunteers packing meals for food-insecure individuals during an event in New York on the anniversary of 9/11.

Why Americans Stopped Volunteering

The terror attacks on September 11, 2001, inspired a national surge in civic spirit. But volunteering rates have been declining over the last two decades.

a photo of a man paddling his kayak down a flooded street in Charleston following Hurricane Dorian.

In Charleston, the Real Flooding Crisis Is Only Beginning

The historic South Carolina city escaped the worst of the latest storm, but rising seas and an aging drainage system may soon bring chronic inundation.

Sold sign on a house.

Buying Your First Home? A Look at 20-Year Trends

There are fewer people buying a first-home these days, but of those entering the real estate market, more are unmarried, Asian, or Hispanic.  

Why Indonesia's Capital Move Has Environmentalists Worried

With Jakarta jammed and sinking, the Indonesian government has chosen Borneo as the site of its new capital, which it promises to make a “forest city.”

Can Solar Panels Handle the Heat of a Warming World?

High temperatures and humidity make solar panels less efficient. What does that mean for solar power as the climate changes?

a photo of the L.A. Metro Expo Line extension

Why Can’t I Take Public Transit to the Beach?

In the U.S., getting to the beach usually means driving. But some sandy shores can still be reached by train, subway, and bus.

a photo of a man pumping drinking water during the water shortage in Chennai, India.

The Future of the City is Thirsty

A new WRI report on 15 cities across the Global South reveals that access to safe drinking water is often underestimated—and the challenge will only get worse.

How American Cities Score on Clean Energy

The good news: More American cities are taking action. The bad news: There’s a lot left to be done.