Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is an assistant editor at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

With a Bikeshare-Powered Tree, a Town Chooses Sustainability Over Tradition

A Maryland suburb is ringing in the holidays with a message about clean energy.

The exterior of a former factory lit up by red and purple lights

What Post-Industrial Cities Can Learn From Each Other

A new alliance has representatives from Pittsburgh, Essen, Beijing, and other metros swapping strategies for transforming from a factory town to a sustainable city.

Why Would a Scientist Run for City Hall?

Several scientists have pledged to run for seats in Congress, but a handful think their expertise can do the most good in the local halls of power.

A pigeon overlooks New York City

Cities Are One Big Evolutionary Experiment

Urbanization has unintended consequences on city-dwelling creatures, from the peppered moths of the Industrial Revolution to today’s pesticide-resistant bed bug.

Will Higher Fees Hurt the National Park Service's Diversity Efforts?

A trip to Yosemite or Yellowstone doesn’t come cheap. Some experts worry raising the entrance fee from $25 to $70 could make a difference in who is welcomed.

Police cars are pictured.

How Police Are Preparing for the Arrival of Autonomous Cars

Before self-driving cars take over the road, first responders need to know what they’ll do in an emergency.

When Should Commuters Ditch Transit for Uber?

D.C. offers an early look at how cities can take advantage of the data Uber makes available to them.

Cities Want Super-Fast Wireless Internet, But on Their Terms

Mayors, state lawmakers, and carriers can’t agree on who gets to regulate the deployment of next-gen wireless technology—and it’s crucial for the future of smart cities.

Road-Tripping in a 'Hands-Free' Cadillac

I spent nine hours in a car that mostly drove itself—but that didn’t mean I could just sit back and relax.

Tall buildings glow above a busy street scene in New York City

NYC's Tall Order for Greener Buildings

Making existing buildings more energy-efficient can cost millions of dollars. But under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s new mandate, owners must either upgrade or pay a hefty fine.

How Human Activity Is Changing Animal Migration Patterns

A new book maps how animals navigate a world heavily altered by urban development and climate change.

An Unlikely Pairing of Sustainable Development and Hip Hop

Eight entrepreneurs and eight rappers try to sell the world on the UN’s environmental agenda through rap battles.

Can China Support Its (Eventual) Ban on Gas Cars?

Electric vehicles might be the future, but the country’s infrastructure has a long way to go before it can charge them.

A wheelchair user is pictured in front of protest signs about accessibility.

Google Gets Serious About Mapping Wheelchair Accessibility

The tech giant is tapping into its global army of users to make its Maps app more useful for people with disabilities.

Chicago's Path to Become a 'City of Learning'

Four years after launching a digital platform to connect students with out-of-school programs, researchers are reaping the benefits: a large pool of data to study the inequity of informal education.

What Makes a Smart City Truly Smart?

Kansas City has streetlights equipped with sensors and plans to make roads pay for themselves. But its chief innovation officer says there’s nothing smart about them.

The Twists and Turns of Making a Neon Sign

Over a century, the trend has come and gone—and come back again. But the technique has stayed the same.

L.A. County’s Latest Solution to Homelessness Is a Test of Compassion

Residents can get up to $75,000 to build a “granny flat”—if they open it up to a homeless family.

Skyscrapers tower over Singapore's historic Chinatown.

How Do You Measure the Value of a Historic Site?

Debates over historic preservation often run into a problem: There’s plenty of data to support economic arguments, and much less to address questions of cultural value. A research team in Singapore wants to change that.

An illustration of rats is pictured.

Will Cities Ever Outsmart Rats?

The age-old strategy is “see a rat, kill a rat.” The new plan is to end an infestation before it ever begins.

A real estate agent shows a Seattle home for sale to her client from Beijing.

The Chinese Pursuit of the American Dream

Chinese citizens are the top foreign buyers of homes in the U.S. As Beijing cracks down on money going abroad, will America’s real estate market feel the impact?