Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is an assistant editor at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

World map showing the 400-plus large cities that sit in biodiversity hotspots

Mapping the 'Conflict Zones' Between Sprawl and Biodiversity

If cities keep growing as they do now, nearly 400 of them will sprawl into the habitats of endangered species by 2030.

In Cities, Coyotes and Foxes Are Learning to Get Along

Researchers say coyotes and foxes thrive in the city by defying their natural instincts to stay away from one another.

More Lights, More Diseases?

An ongoing study suggests light pollution’s effects on animals can help spread some viruses, like West Nile.

Seoul's Answer to a Pollution Crisis: Free Public Transit

It’s a costly move that has only produced meager results in other cities. Could it bring real change to South Korea’s smog-choked capital?

A student is pictured using his mobile phone.

Could You Live Entirely on Mobile Internet? Try It for a Day

Millions of Americans lack high-speed internet at home and have to rely on smartphones to connect. The MobileOnly Challenge asks more people to understand how limiting that can be.

2017 Set a Record for Most New Skyscrapers in One Year

But 2018 is coming for the title.

The High-Speed Train at the Heart of Hong Kong's Political Future

China is building a new train to cut travel time significantly between Hong Kong and Guangzhou. But pro-democracy activists are uneasy about mainland’s intentions.

People dressed in costumes as Super Mario, super heroes and others drive custom built Go-Karts through a street in Tokyo.

Japan Asks Tourists to Buckle Up When Reenacting Mario Kart on City Streets

If you must dress up as Wario for a go-kart tour of Tokyo, please be safe.

Google Street View Can Reveal How Your Neighborhood Votes

You can learn a lot about an area just from the cars parked on its streets.

A Solemn Memorial Sparks a Feud Between Sister Cities

San Francisco's new monument to "comfort women" has Osaka, Japan, threatening to end a decades-long relationship.

With a Bikeshare-Powered Tree, a Town Chooses Sustainability Over Tradition

A Maryland suburb is ringing in the holidays with a message about clean energy.

The exterior of a former factory lit up by red and purple lights

What Post-Industrial Cities Can Learn From Each Other

A new alliance has representatives from Pittsburgh, Essen, Beijing, and other metros swapping strategies for transforming from a factory town to a sustainable city.

Why Would a Scientist Run for City Hall?

Several scientists have pledged to run for seats in Congress, but a handful think their expertise can do the most good in the local halls of power.

A pigeon overlooks New York City

Cities Are One Big Evolutionary Experiment

Urbanization has unintended consequences on city-dwelling creatures, from the peppered moths of the Industrial Revolution to today’s pesticide-resistant bed bug.

Will Higher Fees Hurt the National Park Service's Diversity Efforts?

A trip to Yosemite or Yellowstone doesn’t come cheap. Some experts worry raising the entrance fee from $25 to $70 could make a difference in who is welcomed.

Police cars are pictured.

How Police Are Preparing for the Arrival of Autonomous Cars

Before self-driving cars take over the road, first responders need to know what they’ll do in an emergency.

When Should Commuters Ditch Transit for Uber?

D.C. offers an early look at how cities can take advantage of the data Uber makes available to them.

Cities Want Super-Fast Wireless Internet, But on Their Terms

Mayors, state lawmakers, and carriers can’t agree on who gets to regulate the deployment of next-gen wireless technology—and it’s crucial for the future of smart cities.

Road-Tripping in a 'Hands-Free' Cadillac

I spent nine hours in a car that mostly drove itself—but that didn’t mean I could just sit back and relax.

Tall buildings glow above a busy street scene in New York City

NYC's Tall Order for Greener Buildings

Making existing buildings more energy-efficient can cost millions of dollars. But under Mayor Bill de Blasio’s new mandate, owners must either upgrade or pay a hefty fine.

How Human Activity Is Changing Animal Migration Patterns

A new book maps how animals navigate a world heavily altered by urban development and climate change.