Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is a staff writer at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

a photo of bus stop benches in Rochester, New York

Take a Seat: 5 Brilliant Bus Stop Fixes

When cities fail to provide basic amenities like seats at bus stops, community organizations step in with creative DIY fixes.

A photo of a fleet of electric buses in Santiago, Chile.

Why U.S. Cities Aren’t Using More Electric Buses

Two reports from the World Resource Institute look at the biggest barriers to electrifying the global bus fleet—and how cities can overcome them.

The Squirrel Census Answers a Question You Weren’t Asking

How many squirrels live in New York City's Central Park? Finding the answer was surprisingly complicated.

The Essential Map for LGBTQ Outdoor Enthusiasts

For Pride Month, two organizations are making it easier to find LGBTQ outdoor recreation groups across the U.S.

A road is blocked by flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence.

Google Maps Wants to Help You Navigate During Natural Disasters

The app will offer crisis navigation warnings and provide detailed visual information about hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes.

A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.

Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks at Night?

Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

a photo of a boy cooling off in a water fountain in New York's Central Park.

If Climate Goals Aren’t Met, Extreme Heat Will Kill Thousands in U.S. Cities

A new report estimates as many as 2,700 heat-related deaths can be prevented in just one city if global temperature rise can be limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

U.S. Cities Are Seeing a Big Drop in Tourism From China

Travel from China to the U.S. fell for the first time in over a decade. That could mean money lost for big cities as well as smaller places near national parks.

CityLab Daily: In a Town Shaped by Water, the River Is Winning

Also: The city that’s giving people money, and what redlining has to do with asthma.

An illustration of the Memorial Day flood in Ellicott City, Maryland.

In a Town Shaped by Water, the River Is Winning

Storms supercharged by climate change pose a dire threat to river towns. After two catastrophic floods, tiny Ellicott City faces a critical decision: Rebuild, or retreat?

The Problem With Outlawing Distracted Walking

A New York lawmaker wants to fine pedestrians who text while crossing streets. Street-safety advocates say that’s ineffective, and may even cause more harm.

Indonesia's President Joko Widodo speaks at a podium as people photograph him.

Why Indonesia Wants to Move Its Capital Out of Jakarta

Jakarta has 10 million people and is sinking faster than any other city in the world. But there are other factors involved in its relocation plan.

A young girl winces from the sting as she receives the polio vaccine in 1954.

How Mandatory Vaccination Fueled the Anti-Vaxxer Movement

To better understand the controversy over New York’s measles outbreak, you have to go back to the late 19th century.

A photo of Ellicott City's Main Street

How Historic Ellicott City Plans to Survive the Next Flood

After catastrophic storms in 2016 and 2018, the Maryland mill town has five flood control plans. But it faces hard choices on how to avoid future disasters.

Jason Hardesty poses with a pup outside a New Orleans bar.

A Perk of Delivering Mail: Meeting All the Good Dogs

Meet the UPS driver who proves once and for all that mail carriers and dogs can live in harmony.

Think You’re Faster Than the D.C. Streetcar? Think Again.

Streetcars without dedicated lanes tend to be on the slow side. But beating this much-maligned public transportation mode on foot wasn’t as easy as it looks.

Kamala Harris's $15 Million Proposal to Fix Local Government Tech

The 2020 presidential candidate introduced a bill to help local governments modernize their digital services. Is this the lifeline cities need?

Who Were Milwaukee’s ‘Sewer Socialist’ Mayors?

The city stands apart for electing three socialist mayors, but their work on infrastructure, parks, and housing looks much like what’s expected of mayors today.