Linda Poon

Linda Poon

Linda Poon is a staff writer at CityLab covering science and urban technology, including smart cities and climate change. She previously covered global health and development for NPR’s Goats and Soda blog.

It's Getting Too Damn Hot to Have Fun in the Summer

An environmental economist explains how climate change and extreme weather could mean summer is no longer the peak season for festivals and outdoor recreation.

a photo of Los Angeles in 1962

Mapping the Effects of the Great 1960s ‘Freeway Revolts’

Urbanites who battled the construction of the Interstate Highway System in the 1960s saved some neighborhoods—but many highways did transform cities.

A chef prepares food at a restaurant in Beijing, China.

What Restaurant Reviews Reveal About Cities

Where official census data is sparse, MIT researchers find that restaurant review websites can offer similar demographic and economic information.

Here’s What the Heat Island Looks Like in East Coast Cities

Maps of urban heat islands show where residents can find pockets of cooler air in Boston, Philadelphia, Richmond, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C.

A migrant laborer rides a bicycle past a residential community in Shanghai.

When Affordable Housing in Shanghai Is a Bed in the Kitchen

In this sector of the city’s informal housing rental market, as many as 24 people can be crammed into a three-bedroom apartment.

Hurricane Barry Is on the Way, and New Orleans Is Already Soaked

An “unprecedented” hurricane may bring three dangerous kinds of flooding all at once: rainfall, a storm surge, and overflow from a swollen Mississippi River.

A car half-submerged in water on a roadway during a flash flood.

D.C.’s ‘Historic’ Flash Flood May Soon Be Normal

One-hundred-year storms, of the kind that wreaked havoc on the nation’s capital Monday, are expected to become 1-in-25-year events by mid-century.

‘Reading the City’ Helps Travelers Find Books About Their Destinations

If guidebooks aren’t your thing, check out these stories to learn about the cities you’re visiting next.

a photo of bus stop benches in Rochester, New York

Take a Seat: 5 Brilliant Bus Stop Fixes

When cities fail to provide basic amenities like seats at bus stops, community organizations step in with creative DIY fixes.

A photo of a fleet of electric buses in Santiago, Chile.

Why U.S. Cities Aren’t Using More Electric Buses

Two reports from the World Resource Institute look at the biggest barriers to electrifying the global bus fleet—and how cities can overcome them.

The Squirrel Census Answers a Question You Weren’t Asking

How many squirrels live in New York City's Central Park? Finding the answer was surprisingly complicated.

The Essential Map for LGBTQ Outdoor Enthusiasts

For Pride Month, two organizations are making it easier to find LGBTQ outdoor recreation groups across the U.S.

A road is blocked by flood waters in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence.

Google Maps Wants to Help You Navigate During Natural Disasters

The app will offer crisis navigation warnings and provide detailed visual information about hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes.

A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.

Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks at Night?

Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

a photo of a boy cooling off in a water fountain in New York's Central Park.

If Climate Goals Aren’t Met, Extreme Heat Will Kill Thousands in U.S. Cities

A new report estimates as many as 2,700 heat-related deaths can be prevented in just one city if global temperature rise can be limited to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

U.S. Cities Are Seeing a Big Drop in Tourism From China

Travel from China to the U.S. fell for the first time in over a decade. That could mean money lost for big cities as well as smaller places near national parks.

CityLab Daily: In a Town Shaped by Water, the River Is Winning

Also: The city that’s giving people money, and what redlining has to do with asthma.

An illustration of the Memorial Day flood in Ellicott City, Maryland.

In a Town Shaped by Water, the River Is Winning

Storms supercharged by climate change pose a dire threat to river towns. After two catastrophic floods, tiny Ellicott City faces a critical decision: Rebuild, or retreat?