Mark Byrnes

Mark Byrnes is a senior associate editor at CityLab who writes about design and architecture.

Mosaics of silver-colored dogs line the walls of a New York subway station.

The New Stars of a NYC Subway Station: Very Good Doggos

Artist William Wegman’s famous Weimaraners are now immortalized in mosaics in the New York subway.

Three images of built and unbuilt work by Modernist architect Paul Rudolph for Hong Kong.

Revisiting Architect Paul Rudolph’s Hong Kong Years

A new exhibit highlights the Modernist architect’s little-known designs made while working in Asia.

A drawing of humans assembling a modular municipal installation next to a photo of three men assembling one in real life.

When Soviet Industrial Designers Imagined a Better World

Thanks to tireless work by the Moscow Museum of Design, a forgotten institute’s lost work is being introduced to a new generation of designers.

Graphic designer Burton Kramer thumbs through the pages of the CBC design standards manual he created.

How Canada Discovered Its Visual Identity

A documentary by Vancouver-based graphic designer Greg Durrell explores the surprisingly rich history behind the nation’s postwar design culture.

A curvy, one-story white building from the 1960s with glass walls and teal trim located in Naugatuck, Connecticut.

An Ultimate Architectural Road Trip of East Coast Mid-Century Modernism

Architecture writer Sam Lubell and photographer Darren Bradley reveal the hidden gems and greatest hits of postwar design along the Eastern Seaboard.

How Boston Got Its ‘T’

Designers Peter Chermayeff and Tom Geismar talk about how they gave the MBTA an enduring makeover.

A Canadian Hockey Brawl Over Subway Art

At a Toronto station that fed fans into the city’s hockey arena, a 1985 mural that depicted the Maple Leafs’ biggest rival enraged team owner Harold Ballard.

It’s Time to Feel the Sexy Pulse of a 1980s Transit Mall

The original vision for the Buffalo’s failed car-free-zone downtown was always a fantasy, as this TV spot shows.

Long Live the World’s Greatest Local TV News Theme

Philadelphia’s “Move Closer To Your World” has some new fans this week, thanks to a viral video.

Chicago’s ‘Shapes’ Return 50 Years Later

John Massey’s minimalist designs are back on State Street in the Loop for the rest of August.

A Struggling Metro System’s Big, Vague, Self-Destructive Idea

In an effort to boost ridership, Buffalo’s transit authority is offering developers a chance to revamp its stations. What’s wrong with that?

How to Build a Rust Belt Art Boom

Aaron Ott, the first-ever curator of public art at Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Art Gallery, talks about leading an uncommon cultural initiative across Western New York.

A 1959 Sneak Peek at Lisbon’s Metro System

Just before the transit service began, locals saw this short film on television and movie screens across the city.

Touring Milan’s Metro System in the ‘80s

Transit workers and passengers share their insights on the growing system in its early years.

A Community Restores Its Keith Haring Mural

Three decades after the beloved New York artist visited a school in Melbourne, the mural he made has finally been conserved after significant decay.

Imagining a ‘Canadian Anti-Tourist League’

In a short 1950s comedy, a small group of grumpy natives celebrate awful customer service in the hopes of keeping Americans away.

A Soviet Synthpop Tribute to the Private Vehicle

A love for cars among today’s middle-aged Muscovites surely traces back to this song from their teen years.

The American Heroes of St. Louis’s Gateway Arch

Monument to the Dream gives the construction workers behind an American design icon their proper due.

Understanding the Architecture of the Moscow Metro

Generations of Russian leaders have imposed their visions on the city's vast subway network.

An Action-Packed Guide to Houston’s Public Services

Before the law finally came down on him, an infamous Harris County commissioner proudly explained how he was spending taxpayer funds.

Life in a 1960s ‘Averagetown’

According to David Brinkley and a supercomputer, Salem, New Jersey, was the most typical place in America leading up to Lyndon Johnson’s reelection.