Mark Byrnes

Mark Byrnes is a senior associate editor at CityLab who writes about design, history, and photography.

Three photographs of different architectural styles in downtown Toronto

Updating Toronto's Architecture Bible

An interview with Alex Bozikovic, architecture critic and co-author of a guide to the city’s expansive building stock.

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery

A Modernist Masterpiece, Under Fire in Buffalo

Gordon Bunshaft was a singular force behind Modernist architecture in America. Now his greatest gift to his hometown may be at risk.

Moshe Safdie observing construction at Habitat 67

Revisiting 'Habitat' 50 Years Later

Architect Moshe Safdie talks about his most celebrated project and how it still influences housing today.

A rendering of Piano's Palais de Justice in Paris.

How Renzo Piano Builds Cities

The 79-year-old architect discusses how openness in architecture makes for safer, happier places.

Lynch's map of the NYC subway is geographically accurate.

What a Geographically Accurate New York City Subway Map Looks Like

One cartographer has done the heavy lifting, and rail fans are pumped.

A Dream Of Good Housing In Moscow

An early ‘60s film captures the allure of the Soviet-style apartment living. More than 50 years later, these same housing complexes are facing deterioration and demolition.

Tracking 25 Years of Rebirth and Ruin in Detroit

Camilo Jose Vergara reflects on what he’s learned from photographing the city since the early ‘90s.

A Look Back at Expo 67's U.S. Pavilion

Bold on the outside, campy on the inside—the Buckminster Fuller and Cambridge Seven Associates project showed visitors that the world’s superpower could have fun, too.

The EPA's 40-Year-Old Design Manual Is Being Reissued

New audiences can relive Chermayeff and Geismar’s visual standards made for the agency in 1977.

Why the Jane Jacobs vs. Robert Moses Battle Still Matters

A Q&A with Matt Tyrnauer, director of Citizen Jane: Battle For The City.

Let's Watch Spanish Pop Singers Serenade Everyone at Expo '70

“Osaka Show” shows off the surprisingly progressive (and fun) side of state television under Francisco Franco.

The World's Most Elegant Public Transit Campaign

The Toronto Transit Commission and the National Ballet of Canada have the antidote to the depressing “If You See Something, Say Something.”

Dallas, According to an '80s Rock Band From France

[Extremely French voice] “Dallas.”

Seeing the Light With Jean Nouvel

A short documentary on the 2008 Pritzker Prize winner doesn’t show his eccentric creative process—just the fruits of it.

Nelson Rockefeller's Big Ideas

University campuses, affordable housing, and absurdly grand state building complexes define the liberal legacy of the former New York Republican.

Don't Forget About Ed Logue

Lurking in the background of today’s Jane Jacobs vs. Robert Moses stories is a man who had a little bit of both in his soul.

The Disappearing Mass Housing of the Soviet Union

The grim prefab Khrushchyovka helped solve the USSR’s housing crisis after World War II. Now, Moscow plans to demolish 8,000 of them, displacing more than 1.5 million people. Should any be preserved for posterity?

An Animated Soviet Guide to Building Block Housing

A cartoon from a romcom uses humor to criticize formulaic apartment construction under Brezhnev.

The Hague's City Hall Has Been Mondrian'd

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the De Stijl movement, Richard Meier’s only project in the Netherlands is getting an extremely Dutch treatment.

The Cartoon Animals Teaching Etiquette to Seattle Straphangers

SoundTransit’s campaign uses disarming creatures to help riders in the famously passive-aggressive city learn how to coexist.

Why Marcel Breuer Was 2016's Unlikeliest Starchitect

The author of a new book on the Brutalist architect explains why his buildings are both admired and imperiled today.