Matt Schiavenza

Matt Schiavenza is the senior content manager at the Asia Society and a former contributing writer for The Atlantic.

The Economics of California's Drought

What happens when the country's largest state runs low on water?

China's Surprise Viral Hit: An Environmental Documentary

A film criticizing Beijing's pollution record has logged millions of views, and the government now appears to be acknowledging its failures to implement reforms.

Vancouver Experiments With Prescription Heroin

One of North America's most progressive cities in respect to drug policy is trying a radical attempt at harm reduction. Will it work?

Death on the New York Subway

61-year-old Wai Kuen Kwok died Sunday after being shoved in front of an oncoming train. The city has no plans to invest in protective barriers.

New York City's Marijuana Reform Doesn't Go Far Enough

The NYPD may no longer arrest people for pot possession—but the new system may be no better.

Mayor Accused of Disappearing Students in Mexico Has Been Caught

Despite the successful arrest of the abduction's alleged mastermind, the crisis has reminded the nation of an uglier past.

Dying at Work—and From Overwork

Eleven Americans perish each day at their place of employment. But in other developed countries, work itself is the killer.

Criminalizing the Hands That Feed the Homeless

More cities are trying to stop residents and food pantries from helping people secure a hot meal.

The Hong Kong Protesters Who Won't Negotiate

Violence erupted this weekend in densely packed Mong Kok, where a lack of leadership complicates efforts at a resolution.