Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

A large tank truck parked in front of new apartment buildings.

The Divides Within, and Between, Urban and Rural America

Economic growth is not only uneven between urban and rural places—it is uneven within them, too.

A mother and two children riding bikes in the Netherlands

Cycling Is Key to Safer, Healthier, More Vital Cities

In their new book Building the Cycling City: The Dutch Blueprint for Urban Vitality, Melissa and Chris Bruntlett use the example of the Netherlands to show how a cycling culture promotes community building and health.

How ‘Social Infrastructure’ Can Knit America Together

Eric Klinenberg, author of Palaces for the People, talks about how schools, libraries, and other institutions can restore a sense of common purpose in America.

A power plant behind a row of homes in Somerset, Massachusetts.

NIMBYs Dominate Local Zoning Meetings

A study of the Boston area shows that those who participate in planning and zoning board meetings are older, wealthier, and much more NIMBYish.

A 7-Eleven employee puts a bottle into a paper bag.

Why Cities Must Take the Lead on Upgrading Service Jobs

Millions of U.S. workers hold insecure jobs that don’t pay enough to support a family. That needs to change, and cities can lead the way.

Clinton/Kaine campaign signs line a sidewalk in a residential neighborhood.

How Land-Use Restrictions Make Places Tilt Left

Communities with strict land-use restrictions don’t just attract more Democrats, a new study finds. They also shut out people who tend to vote Republican.

A large tan house for sale in Vienna, Virginia.

The Politics of Homeownership

Homeowners are more active in national and local politics than non-owners. This disproportionate involvement can potentially limit the economy and further divide our politics.

Officers check cars at a Massachusetts prison

Released Prisoners Struggle to Establish Neighborhood Connections

Black and Hispanic former prisoners end up in more disadvantaged areas than whites, and many do not find any place to attach to at all.

Law-enforcement officers stand at a New York City crime scene.

The Geography of Urban Violence

A new online mapping tool allows you to track long-term trends in violence across dozens of U.S. cities.

The Amazon spheres in Seattle

Righting the Wrongs of Amazon HQ2

What should or could cities do differently next time a behemoth company solicits bids for for its headquarters?

An aerial view of the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, California.

Why Some Startups Move to the Bay Area (But Most Stay Put)

A new study explores startup migration and the benefits it brings.

An image from the grand opening of Manhattan's Second Avenue Subway line in 2017. Officials have been criticized for opening it before it extended past East 96th Street, a dividing line that separates one of Manhattan's wealthiest neighborhoods, the Upper East Side, from East Harlem, one of the poorest.

The Segregation of Our Everyday Lives

A new study analyzes Twitter data and finds that racial segregation not only divides us based on where we live, but how we travel around cities.

Graffiti on a wall reads "Tourist Go Home."

The Global Tourism Backlash

A surge in tourism has led to a backlash in cities where residents feel overrun. How can these cities use tourism to their benefit?

Students on a college campus.

The Winners and Losers of America’s Startup Economy

Established tech hubs continue to lead, but startup hubs are emerging in new, smaller places. The catch: Startup financing overall is on the wane.

A woman walks by an office building.

Why the Next Silicon Valley Will Probably Be Outside the U.S.

The biggest challenges to the Bay Area’s dominance in tech will likely come from overseas.

Abandoned, derelict city rowhouses.

Vacancy: America’s Other Housing Crisis

As empty homes sit in purgatory, neighborhoods fray and cities are left to pick up the bill.

A skateboarder in an empty parking lot

Parking Has Eaten American Cities

A new study documents the huge amount of space taken up by parking, and the astronomical costs it represents, in five U.S. cities.

A view of traffic near Los Angeles.

How Cars Divide America

Car dependence not only reduces our quality of life, it’s a crucial factor in America’s economic and political divisions.

A view from outside a glass office tower at dusk of the workers inside.

Cities and the Vertical Economy

Vertical clustering—of certain high-status industries on the higher floors of buildings, for example—is an important part of urban agglomeration.

Lynx robot with Amazon Alexa on display in Las Vegas

America’s Robot Geography

The robotics industry is powered by high-tech centers as well as manufacturing hubs—with a distinct “Robot Belt” in the Midwest.

A man bikes down a busy London street with a food-delivery box on the back of his bike.

The Rise of ‘Urban Tech’

From food-delivery startups to mapping and co-living companies, technology focused on urban systems is drawing billions of dollars in venture capital.