Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate and visiting fellow at Florida International University.

The Coronavirus Class Divide in Cities

Places like New York, Miami and Las Vegas have a higher share of the workforce in jobs with close proximity to others, putting them at greater Covid-19 risk.

A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.

The Geography of Coronavirus

What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

We'll Need To Reopen Our Cities. But Not Without Making Changes First.

We must prepare for a protracted battle with coronavirus. But there are changes we can make now to prepare locked-down cities for what’s next.

photo: woman working in auto factory

How Valuing Productivity, Not Profession, Could Reduce U.S. Inequality

In this second part of an interview with economist Jonathan Rothwell, he explains that a just society wouldn’t reward different professions so unequally.

Patrice A. Harris is president of the American Medical Association.

How Elite Professions Create Inequality

In this interview with Jonathan Rothwell about his new book, A Republic of Equals, he explains how U.S. racism helped create elite, highly paid professions.

People clink together glasses of beer at a bar.

Has the Rise of Uber Led to More Heavy Drinking?

New research suggests that ride-hailing is associated with increases in drinking behaviors in U.S. cities and metro areas.

photo: people in an atrium

Four Coastal Areas Dominate a New Measure of Tech-Company Startup Diversity

Just four coastal areas of the country dominate on the Startup Complexity Index, a new measure developed by researchers at the Brookings Institution.

How Media Coverage of Car Crashes Downplays the Role of Drivers

Safety advocates have long complained that media outlets tend to blame pedestrians and cyclists who are hit by cars. Research suggests they’re right.

A syringe sits on top of a car. Houses are behind it.

The Changing Geography of the Opioid Crisis

A new study shows that the country faces different opioid challenges in urban and rural areas.

Mapping America’s Stark Wage Inequality

Since 1980, economists say, wage growth for the highest-paid workers has been roughly triple that for the lowest paid. In some cities, the disparity is wider.

A row of urban storefronts at dusk, with one light on.

How to Grow the Wealth of Poor Neighborhoods From the Bottom Up

A new report spells out how to move from the top-down, grant-based model for community development to a more localized, entrepreneurial approach.

A female doctor in a white coat examines a patient

How AI Could Change the Highly-Skilled Job Market

A new study uses artificial intelligence to find that jobs done by highly skilled workers are the most likely to be affected by AI.

Talent May Be Shifting Away From Superstar Cities

According to a new analysis, places away from the coasts in the Sunbelt and West are pulling ahead when it comes to attracting talented workers.

Tailored Place-Based Policies Are Key to Reducing Regional Inequality

Economist Timothy Bartik details the need for place-based policy to combat regional inequality and help distressed places—strategies outlined in his new book.

Three men wearing suits raise shovels full of dirt in front of an American flag.

How Cities and States Can Stop the Incentive Madness

Economist Timothy Bartik explains why the public costs of tax incentives often outweigh the benefits, and describes a model business-incentive package.

for sale signs on lawns

The Changing Demographics of America's Suburbs

The changes in the demographic makeup of America’s suburbs are so profound that some urbanists are calling for a new sociology of suburbia.

How Airline Deregulation Fueled Regional Inequality in the U.S.

The concentration of airline service resulting from deregulation has tilted the economic playing field toward larger metropolitan areas.

Two women at a bar with a bottle between them.

The Particular Creativity of Dense Urban Neighborhoods

A new study finds evidence that Jane Jacobs was right about the dynamic and innovative qualities spurred by living in dense, urban neighborhoods.

Cars jam an early-morning freeway in California.

Urban and Suburban Lifestyles Are More Similar Than You’d Think

A new study finds strong similarities in how residents of U.S. cities and suburbs spend their time—with one, counterintuitive difference.

rear view of a woman and child on a city street with umbrellas

Kids Raised in Walkable Cities Earn More Money As Adults

A new study finds that even considering other factors, the walkability of a child’s neighborhood has a direct correlation to increased adult earnings.

The World Series Isn’t Global, But Baseball Players Are

Back in 1900, just 4 percent of Major League Baseball players were born outside the U.S. Today the share is nearly 30 percent.