Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

Students celebrate at commencement holding inflatable globes.

Why Global Talent Clusters Around Cities

For now, U.S. cities lead in attracting global talent, but cities across the world are coming on strong.

vacant store fronts in mining town in Arizona

America’s Worsening Geographic Inequality

The economic gap between have and have-not places continues to widen.

A man in a blazer stands on a stage giving a presentation

America Is Losing Its Edge for Startups

It used to be that 95 percent of global startup and venture-capital activity happened in the U.S. Today, it’s just over one-half.

Congressional districts, by density.

How the Suburbs Will Swing the Midterm Election

Close congressional races this November will likely hinge on the moods of suburban voters, a new CityLab analysis finds.

Protesters gathering

Amazon Stepped Up for Workers. It Should Do the Same for Cities

Amazon announced a new $15 minimum wage for its workers. Now it should be a better corporate citizen to the host of its new HQ2.

Two girls walk past a school

Some Rural Areas Are Better for Economic Mobility

Kids from many rural areas have a better chance at upward mobility than those who grow up in urban areas, but it varies from place to place, and from neighborhood to neighborhood.

Three men and one woman in professional dress sit onstage at a panel discussion.

Why Real Change Won’t Come From Billionaire Philanthropists

In his new book Winners Take All, Anand Giridharadas argues that plutocrats have co-opted the language of social change while reinforcing their own power.

A large factory in the desert

Some Rural Counties Are Seeing a Job Boom, Too

Economic growth is a mixed bag in urban and rural counties, large and small.

Passengers wait in a German subway station

The Global Mass Transit Revolution

A new report confirms that the U.S. lags behind the rest of the world in mass transit.

A large tank truck parked in front of new apartment buildings.

The Divides Within, and Between, Urban and Rural America

Economic growth is not only uneven between urban and rural places—it is uneven within them, too.

A mother and two children riding bikes in the Netherlands

Cycling Is Key to Safer, Healthier, More Vital Cities

In their new book Building the Cycling City: The Dutch Blueprint for Urban Vitality, Melissa and Chris Bruntlett use the example of the Netherlands to show how a cycling culture promotes community building and health.

How ‘Social Infrastructure’ Can Knit America Together

Eric Klinenberg, author of Palaces for the People, talks about how schools, libraries, and other institutions can restore a sense of common purpose in America.

A power plant behind a row of homes in Somerset, Massachusetts.

NIMBYs Dominate Local Zoning Meetings

A study of the Boston area shows that those who participate in planning and zoning board meetings are older, wealthier, and much more NIMBYish.

A 7-Eleven employee puts a bottle into a paper bag.

Why Cities Must Take the Lead on Upgrading Service Jobs

Millions of U.S. workers hold insecure jobs that don’t pay enough to support a family. That needs to change, and cities can lead the way.

Clinton/Kaine campaign signs line a sidewalk in a residential neighborhood.

How Land-Use Restrictions Make Places Tilt Left

Communities with strict land-use restrictions don’t just attract more Democrats, a new study finds. They also shut out people who tend to vote Republican.

A large tan house for sale in Vienna, Virginia.

The Politics of Homeownership

Homeowners are more active in national and local politics than non-owners. This disproportionate involvement can potentially limit the economy and further divide our politics.

Officers check cars at a Massachusetts prison

Released Prisoners Struggle to Establish Neighborhood Connections

Black and Hispanic former prisoners end up in more disadvantaged areas than whites, and many do not find any place to attach to at all.

Law-enforcement officers stand at a New York City crime scene.

The Geography of Urban Violence

A new online mapping tool allows you to track long-term trends in violence across dozens of U.S. cities.

The Amazon spheres in Seattle

Righting the Wrongs of Amazon HQ2

What should or could cities do differently next time a behemoth company solicits bids for for its headquarters?

An aerial view of the Facebook campus in Menlo Park, California.

Why Some Startups Move to the Bay Area (But Most Stay Put)

A new study explores startup migration and the benefits it brings.

An image from the grand opening of Manhattan's Second Avenue Subway line in 2017. Officials have been criticized for opening it before it extended past East 96th Street, a dividing line that separates one of Manhattan's wealthiest neighborhoods, the Upper East Side, from East Harlem, one of the poorest.

The Segregation of Our Everyday Lives

A new study analyzes Twitter data and finds that racial segregation not only divides us based on where we live, but how we travel around cities.