Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate and visiting fellow at Florida International University.

A Chicago police car.

The Great Crime Decline Is Over in Some Chicago Neighborhoods

Chicago’s most dangerous neighborhoods saw a crime decline, but recently, their violent crime rates have rebounded while other areas continue to improve.

A man wearing a suit and tie holds an American flag at a naturalization ceremony.

The New Geography of American Immigration

The foreign-born population has declined in U.S. states that voted Democratic in 2016, and increased in states and metros that voted for Trump.

A man jogs along the Atlanta BeltLine park as Midtown high-rises stand in the background.

Why Greenway Parks Cause Greater Gentrification

While green spaces are often linked to gentrification, new research shows certain types and characteristics of urban parks play a much greater role than others.

A gold-painted bridge and the skyline of Sacramento.

America’s Hottest Cities for Urban Planners

You might think planners—and urbanists in general—congregate in big coastal metros. But planning jobs are growing fastest elsewhere.

A woman stands in front of a house.

How Housing Wealth Transferred From Families to Corporations

The Great Housing Reset has led to growing numbers of single-family homes shifting from owner-occupied housing to investment vehicles for large corporations.

Why U.S. Tech Inventors Are So Highly Clustered

New research finds that high-tech inventors are significantly more productive when they work in large clusters—but there are drawbacks.

Voters in a line.

Why Cities Are Less Powerful in U.S. National Politics

A new book shows the historical roots behind the concentration of left-leaning Democrats in large cities and metro areas.

Two cyclists and a man on a skateboard travel alongside bus traffic in downtown San Francisco.

The Best and Worst U.S. Places to Live Car-Free

College towns and big coastal cities top our ranking of the metros where it’s easiest to live without a car.

An apartment building with a crane hovering over it.

For Female Entrepreneurs, a Ground-Floor Apartment Is Key

A new study finds that the home-based businesses of poor women in a Colombian city are much more successful when they are located on the street level.

Groups of people look at their phones while sitting in Washington Square Park in Manhattan.

How Socially Integrated Is Your City? Ask Twitter.

Using geotagged tweets, researchers found four types of social connectedness in big U.S. cities, exemplified by New York, San Francisco, Detroit, and Miami.

A mural of Woody Guthrie in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Don't Move People Out of Distressed Places. Instead, Revitalize Them

A new study shows that place-based policies are key to helping people in distressed cities, where investments should be tailored to local economic conditions.

A modest one-story home and a driveway leading to a garage behind it.

What Makes Silicon Valley Different?

Historian Margaret O’Mara talks about her new book The Code and how Silicon Valley has maintained its competitive edge in high tech.

Tents with the Honolulu skyline behind them

Where Is the Best City to Live, Based on Salaries and Cost of Living?

Paychecks stretch the furthest in smaller cities for most workers, but techies continue to do best in larger, more expensive cities.

The Future of the Middle Class Depends on Upgrading Service Jobs

More than 70 million Americans hold low-wage, precarious service jobs. We must make these jobs a pathway to the middle class.

The Atlanta skyline with Mercedes-Benz Stadium

Ranking Cities by the New Urban Crisis

When cities rather than metros are measured by inequality, economic segregation, and affordability, the New Urban Crisis has surprising hits and misses.

A woman using a smartphone and laptop in an urban cafe.

The Changing Geography of America’s Creative Class

Washington, D.C., has the highest share of creative-class workers among large U.S. cities, but Miami’s creative class is growing faster.

Graduates react near the end of commencement exercises at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.

Where Do College Grads Live? The Top and Bottom U.S. Cities

Even though superstar hubs top the list of the most educated cities, other cities are growing their share at a much faster rate.

An aerial photo of downtown Miami.

The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

The Innovations of the Creative Class Affect a Rural Area’s Fortunes

A new study measures innovation and shows that when found in rural areas, it is tied to significant presence of the creative class.

Two women wave their phones in the air at a crowded music festival.

The Rise, and Urbanization, of Big Music Festivals

The legacy of hippie Woodstock is the modern music-festival economy: materialist, driven by celebrities and social media, and increasingly urban.

The Benefits of High-Tech Job Growth Don’t Trickle Down

A new study from the U.K. finds that although high-tech and digital industries spur job growth, less-skilled workers don’t even get spillover benefits.