Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

A vegetable farm next to high-rise apartments in Hong Kong.

Just How Much of the World Is Urban?

Experts at the European Commission assess the world as more urban than experts at the United Nations or New York University do. We need to resolve this debate.

A worker serves customers at a New York diner as the result of the 2016 U.S. presidential election is shown on a TV screen.

The Political Differences of the Creative, Service, and Working Classes

What do the three classes think about issues like gun control, immigration, women’s rights, and unionization?

View of traffic in Long Island City, Queens, looking over the bridge to Manhattan.

Amazon’s HQ2 Search Was About Specialized Talent

Amazon chose Long Island City and Crystal City based on talent. But talent isn’t generic: The search for HQ2 was about particular types of it.

Riders exit the Boston MBTA green line

Why Is Your State Red or Blue? Look to the Dominant Occupational Class

States with more working-class voters are solidly red; those with a dominant creative class are solidly blue; service-class heavy states aren’t easily defined.

Children line up to receive fresh meals from World Central Kitchen.

Chef José Andrés on How Food Helps People Rebuild

The celebrity chef and humanitarian talks about the role of food in recovering from a disaster and why building local capacity is so important.

A mural of the Statues of Liberty and an American flag on a barn in Iowa

The Growing Inequality Between America’s Superstar Cities, and the Rest

A new Brookings study documents the growing economic divergence of America’s superstar cities from smaller urban and rural areas.

Morgan Stanley headquarters in New York City

The Geography of Corporate Headquarters

Complaints that Amazon HQ2 locations are already superstar cities don’t recognize a counter-trend of Fortune 500 corporate headquarters relocations, new data shows.

Cyclists and walks use a trail beside Lady Bird Lake in Austin, Texas.

HQ2 Is Only Part of the Story of Big-Tech Expansion

Amazon HQ2 may be split between superstar cities, but San Francisco’s big tech firms are starting to expand into smaller, non-coastal places.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos speaks in Washington, D.C.

Why New York and D.C. Make Sense for Amazon’s HQ2

In splitting HQ2, Amazon gains a presence in New York, which has the largest number of corporate headquarters, and greater Washington, D.C., which is fast gaining as a popular site for a corporate base.

The campus of Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, a rural magnet for creative-class workers.

Where the Creative Class Thrives in Rural America

Although the creative class in the United States is largely urban, many rural counties also have high shares of knowledge, professional, and artistic workers.

A man and woman kiss outside of the Goldman Sachs headquarters in New York.

The Rise of the Urban Power Couple

It’s not just singles who have flocked back to the city: College-educated married couples are much more likely to live in big cities with high human capital.

A woman on a laptop outdoors at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Talent Dividend in Urban and Rural Areas

Urban places have the largest numbers of college graduates, but rural counties are starting to see more growth.

A photo of Las Vegas apartments with a big red banner offering a move-in special.

Like Race and Class, Commute and Homeownership Divide Us

The constituents of Trump voters in the U.S. Congress offer clues to the role played by the way people live and commute in America’s political divisions.

Two men shake hands across a table at a job fair.

Wages Are Higher in Urban Areas, But Growing Faster in Rural Ones

The picture of wages and salaries across the U.S. is not a simple one of urban success versus rural decline.

Students celebrate at commencement holding inflatable globes.

Why Global Talent Clusters Around Cities

For now, U.S. cities lead in attracting global talent, but cities across the world are coming on strong.

vacant store fronts in mining town in Arizona

America’s Worsening Geographic Inequality

The economic gap between have and have-not places continues to widen.

A man in a blazer stands on a stage giving a presentation

America Is Losing Its Edge for Startups

It used to be that 95 percent of global startup and venture-capital activity happened in the U.S. Today, it’s just over one-half.

Congressional districts, by density.

How the Suburbs Will Swing the Midterm Election

Close congressional races this November will likely hinge on the moods of suburban voters, a new CityLab analysis finds.

Protesters gathering

Amazon Stepped Up for Workers. It Should Do the Same for Cities

Amazon announced a new $15 minimum wage for its workers. Now it should be a better corporate citizen to the host of its new HQ2.

Two girls walk past a school

Some Rural Areas Are Better for Economic Mobility

Kids from many rural areas have a better chance at upward mobility than those who grow up in urban areas, but it varies from place to place, and from neighborhood to neighborhood.

Three men and one woman in professional dress sit onstage at a panel discussion.

Why Real Change Won’t Come From Billionaire Philanthropists

In his new book Winners Take All, Anand Giridharadas argues that plutocrats have co-opted the language of social change while reinforcing their own power.