Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate and visiting fellow at Florida International University.

A woman walks down a city street across from a new apartment and condominium building.

How Housing Supply Became the Most Controversial Issue in Urbanism

New research has kicked off a war of words among urban scholars over the push for upzoning to increase cities’ housing supply.

A map of the money service-class workers have left over after paying for housing

Blue-Collar and Service Workers Fare Better Outside Superstar Cities

How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For working-class and service workers in superstar cities, the affordable housing crisis hits harder.

Alicia Glen speaks into a microphone at a podium inside a tent.

‘You Can't Just Show Up’: Alicia Glen on Amazon's Queens Defeat

In an interview, the former deputy mayor under Bill de Blasio says diversity is the key to New York’s growth: “Even with all of our warts, we’re the best.”

Tourists walk along the High Line in Manhattan, New York City

The Beauty Premium: How Urban Beauty Affects Cities’ Economic Growth

A study finds that the more beautiful a city is, the more successful it is at attracting jobs and new residents, including highly educated and affluent ones.

A photo of construction cranes and tall buildings in downtown Los Angeles.

‘Build More Housing’ Is No Match for Inequality

A new analysis finds that liberalizing zoning rules and building more won’t solve the urban affordability crisis, and could exacerbate it.  

Cars line up in traffic on a freeway in Los Angeles

Long School Commutes Are Terrible for Kids

Children who live farther away from their schools get significantly less sleep and exercise, new research shows.

A photo of graduating college seniors in caps and gowns during commencement.

The Geography of Brain Drain in America

Across the United States, there are fewer states gaining brainpower than draining it, according to a new report from the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee.

Trump Towers I, II and III in Sunny Isles Beach, a suburb of Miami.

Will Miami’s Growth Be Cut Short by Sea-Level Rise?

A conversation with sociologist Alejandro Portes about his new book: Is Miami a global city, or a superstar Latin-American city? And is it going to sink?

A cashier stands behind the counter at a lottery store.

In Praise of a Higher Minimum Wage

Raising the minimum wage helps low-paid workers without damaging the broader economy, the authors of two new research papers find.

A crowded room of residents attend a local public forum in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Are Local Politics As Polarized As National? Depends on the Issue.

Republican or Democrat, even if we battle over national concerns, research finds that in local politics, it seems we can all just get along—most of the time.

Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California

America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

A photo of couples dancing in a park.

The Geography of Online Dating

When looking for love, most people don’t look far from home. That's what a big-data analysis of interactions on a dating site revealed.

A photo of empty storefronts in a small American town.

How ‘Heartland Visas’ Could Reduce Geographic Inequality

Place-based immigrant visas could help revitalize America’s left-behind cities and regions, economic researchers say in a new report.

A school bus driving through a suburb.

How Families With Kids Drive Suburban Segregation

The old divide between family-friendly suburbs and childless city living is fading. The new divide is within the suburbs themselves.

People handle guns on display at a show in Las Vegas.

The 3 Gun-Control Laws That Work Best in the U.S.

States with stricter gun-control laws have fewer homicides, especially when they’re used in combination, according to a new study.

A blue, red, and gray map indicating income inequality in 2013

How the 1 Percent Is Pulling America’s Cities and Regions Apart

America’s growing geographic divide derives from economic inequality, especially the tremendous gains of the 1 percent.

A photo of crowds at Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

The Economic Power of American Arts and Culture

The contribution of culture and art to the U.S. economy is bigger than the economic output of Sweden or Switzerland, according to a new report.

Students cheer at Kalamazoo Central High School graduation.

A Guide to Successful Place-Based Economic Policies

A new Upjohn Institute report documents four key pillars that can guide successful place-based economic development and local job growth.

How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

A cyclist rides through a desert park and nature preserve in Phoenix.

The Inequality of America’s Parks and Green Space

New research finds that income, education, and race are correlated with access to green space across and within U.S. metro areas.

People in New York City

How Density Can Deter Growth in America’s Largest Metros

A new report examines why the largest U.S. metros actually face population decline.