Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

An image from the grand opening of Manhattan's Second Avenue Subway line in 2017. Officials have been criticized for opening it before it extended past East 96th Street, a dividing line that separates one of Manhattan's wealthiest neighborhoods, the Upper East Side, from East Harlem, one of the poorest.

The Segregation of Our Everyday Lives

A new study analyzes Twitter data and finds that racial segregation not only divides us based on where we live, but how we travel around cities.

Graffiti on a wall reads "Tourist Go Home."

The Global Tourism Backlash

A surge in tourism has led to a backlash in cities where residents feel overrun. How can these cities use tourism to their benefit?

Students on a college campus.

The Winners and Losers of America’s Startup Economy

Established tech hubs continue to lead, but startup hubs are emerging in new, smaller places. The catch: Startup financing overall is on the wane.

A woman walks by an office building.

Why the Next Silicon Valley Will Probably Be Outside the U.S.

The biggest challenges to the Bay Area’s dominance in tech will likely come from overseas.

Abandoned, derelict city rowhouses.

Vacancy: America’s Other Housing Crisis

As empty homes sit in purgatory, neighborhoods fray and cities are left to pick up the bill.

A skateboarder in an empty parking lot

Parking Has Eaten American Cities

A new study documents the huge amount of space taken up by parking, and the astronomical costs it represents, in five U.S. cities.

A view of traffic near Los Angeles.

How Cars Divide America

Car dependence not only reduces our quality of life, it’s a crucial factor in America’s economic and political divisions.

A view from outside a glass office tower at dusk of the workers inside.

Cities and the Vertical Economy

Vertical clustering—of certain high-status industries on the higher floors of buildings, for example—is an important part of urban agglomeration.

Lynx robot with Amazon Alexa on display in Las Vegas

America’s Robot Geography

The robotics industry is powered by high-tech centers as well as manufacturing hubs—with a distinct “Robot Belt” in the Midwest.

A man bikes down a busy London street with a food-delivery box on the back of his bike.

The Rise of ‘Urban Tech’

From food-delivery startups to mapping and co-living companies, technology focused on urban systems is drawing billions of dollars in venture capital.

A man shelters from the rain at a bus stop.

‘Climate Gentrification’ Will Deepen Urban Inequality

A new study investigates the intersection of climate change and real estate, and finds that higher elevations bring higher values.

San Francisco's "painted lady" houses under a stormy sky

The Dark Side of the Silicon Gold Rush

Acclaimed urban geographer Richard Walker puts the Bay Area’s tech boom into historical and social context in his new book.

Commuters line a subway platform as a train approaches.

Millennials Are Happiest in Cities

Older Americans prefer smaller and more rural places, but Millennials are happiest in cities, according to a new study.

A fountain surrounded by downtown buildings

The Geography of Talent Shows a Gaining Rust Belt and Sunbelt

Data suggests that Rust Belt and Sunbelt cities are adding highly educated adults—but established knowledge and tech hubs continue to dominate on one important measure.

LeBron James enters an arena as fans snap photos and reach out to touch him.

Learning From LeBron

More people should think about where they want to live and work as seriously as LeBron James does.

Two women prepare food at a McDonald's restaurant.

We Can Create Better Jobs—by Fixing the Bad Ones

More than 65 million Americans toil in insecure, low-paying jobs. Instead of hoping they will all find different, and better, jobs, we should upgrade the ones they already have.

Mothers gather with their babies in New York's Central Park

Don’t Blame Expensive Housing for Falling Fertility

Lower birth rates in expensive cities are more likely due to how Americans self-sort by income, education, age, and other factors.

What To Do About the Rise of Mega-Regions

We need to make urbanism more inclusive and democratic if we want to realize a better future, and that means devolving power from the dysfunctional nation-state to cities and neighborhoods.

Anthony Bourdain in 2001, when he was still the chef-owner of Les Halles in New York City.

Urbanists Could Learn a Lot From Anthony Bourdain

The work of the acclaimed chef and writer, who has died at 61, provides a model for a truly inclusive urbanism based on the creativity of all human beings.

A man walks by a brightly colored mural of activist Malala Yousafzai in Bushwick, a neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York.

How Culture Shapes Economic Development

A new study, drawing on 1.5 million images of cultural spaces in London and New York, finds that cultural capital is a key contributor to urban economic growth.

The campus of Stanford University in California

The Paradox of Prosperity at America’s Universities

As they churn out the talent and technology that drive economic growth, universities also shape deepening urban inequality.