Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a University Professor and Director of Cities at the University of Toronto’s Martin Prosperity Institute, and a Distinguished Fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

The central business district in Beijing, one of the world's emerging tech hubs

The Rise of the Rest (of the World)

American cities still have the edge when it comes to high-tech startups and venture capital, but other parts of the world are rapidly catching up.

Peter Calthorpe

Peter Calthorpe Is Still Fighting Sprawl—With Software

In an interview, the leading New Urbanist Peter Calthorpe discusses autonomous rapid transit, Buckminster Fuller, NIMBYism, and his new urban-planning software.

A home for sale in the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco

Is Housing Inequality the Main Driver of Economic Inequality?

A growing body of research suggests that inequality in the value of Americans’ homes is a major factor—perhaps the key factor—in the country’s economic divides.

Villa 31, an informal settlement in Buenos Aires

The Global Housing Crisis

Scarce, unaffordable housing is not a local problem in a few places, but is baked into the 21st-century global city. It’s time for cities, nations, and global leaders to start acting like it.

How Your Social Class Affects Where You'll Move

Socioeconomic sorting at the metropolitan level is making America more polarized, an economist finds.

Which U.S. Cities Are Most Food Truck-Friendly?

A new study breaks down where the administrative hurdles to opening a restaurant on wheels are the worst.

The Extreme Geographic Inequality of High-Tech Venture Capital

The rest aren’t rising, and spatial inequality is getting worse.

Murals depicting David Bowie and Bernie Sanders in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles

Do Art Scenes Really Lead to Gentrification?

A new study finds that arts establishments are actually more concentrated in affluent and gentrified—rather than gentrifying—neighborhoods.

A woman at a homeless encampment in Anaheim, California

The Unhappy States of America

Even with the economy humming, Americans are feeling more anxious, depressed, and dissatisfied with their lives than they did in 2009.

Riot police protect members of the Ku Klux Klan from counter-protesters

Where Hate Groups Are Concentrated in the U.S.

Organized hate groups are found in 340 counties—but those counties spread across every state of the union.

Students at William Hackett Middle School in Albany pass through metal detectors.

America's Growing 'Guard Labor' Force

Many large urban areas in the U.S. now have more “guard labor” than teachers.

One-way signs in the financial district in New York City

Do Two-Way Streets Help a City's Economy?

There’s more than one way for neighborhoods to respond to two-way street conversions, new research suggests.

The Geography of Millennial Talent

Millennials are more distributed across cities, suburbs, and exurbs than is commonly thought, but the clustering of college graduates does reinforce the country’s spatial inequality.

Police show their support at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

Where Do Mass Shootings Take Place?

In every kind of American community, data shows.

A spectator raises Norway's flag and a horned helmet as gold medalist Marit Bjoergen celebrates on the podium.

This Was Team USA's Worst Winter Olympics in 20 Years

Here’s to doing better in 2022.

A ski resort in Colorado

The Geography of the U.S. Olympic Team

Despite the specialized nature of winter sports, Team USA in the 2018 Games hails from across the map.

Oystein Braaten celebrates with a Norwegian flag after winning the men's ski slopestyle finals.

The U.S. Is Getting Crushed in the Winter Olympics

Meanwhile, smaller nations with cold climates dominate.

A sign supporting President Trump in front of a house in Crown City, Ohio

The Geography of Trump's First-Year Job Approval

The president’s approval rating stands at a record low, but the geography of opinion reflects pre-existing cultural, educational, and economic divides.

Medics take a woman out of a grocery store where she was found unresponsive after overdosing on opioids.

The Real Cause of the Opioid Crisis

According to a new study, economic despair is not the primary factor driving abuse of opioids.

An autonomous vehicle crosses one of Pittsburgh's iconic bridges.

Bill Peduto: 'Pittsburgh Was Already a Decade Ahead'

Pittsburgh’s mayor talks about the city becoming the capital of autonomous vehicles and the challenge of including everyone in its renewal.

Yard signs for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump during the 2016 election season

How Trump's Tax Cuts Could Change the Electoral Map

There’s evidence of a talent shift from cities like New York and L.A. to large Sunbelt metros in red and purple states. But it will do little to ease spatial inequality.