Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

Amazon’s HQ2 Fiasco Will Cost the Company More Than It Costs New York

The mega-company has bucked dealing reasonably with New York City, Seattle, and any community that asks them to pay for its freight.

A husband and wife kiss on the Empire State Building after their Valentine's Day Wedding

The Cities With the Most Singles

Where you live can have a big impact on your Valentine’s Day by changing the odds of meeting potential mates.

A photo of debris in front of damaged homes after Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans.

How Natural Disasters Can Spur Gentrification

New Orleans neighborhoods that were damaged by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were more likely to gentrify over the following 10 years, researchers find.

Portrait of Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City speaking at a news conference.

Why Mayors Keep Trying to Woo Business With Tax Breaks

U.S. mayors are split on whether business incentives are good politics, but most believe—despite evidence to the contrary—that they’re good policy.

Condo buildings under construction in Miami

How Affordable Housing Can Improve the American Economy

Building more affordable housing units in the metros that are centers of innovation will increase demand for the wares that fill houses, and increase productivity.

A billboard advertising a new condominium tower stands in front of dilapidated houses.

Does Upzoning Boost the Housing Supply and Lower Prices? Maybe Not.

A new study of zoning changes in Chicago finds that they led to higher, not lower, local home prices, while having no discernible impact on local housing supply.

A police officer displays a handgun checked in during a community gun buy-back program.

Teen Suicide Rates Are Higher In States Where More People Own Guns

A new study finds a striking correlation at the state level between rates of household gun ownership and youth suicide.

A group of high school students walk through the campus gates

Where Youth Find Their Partners in Crime

A new study examines the role of neighborhood proximity and school segregation in the clustering of youth crime.

New Yorkers riding the subway.

The Great Divide in How Americans Commute to Work

We are cleaving into two nations—one where daily life revolves around the car, and the other where the car is receding in favor of walking, biking, and transit.

Former Toronto mayor Rob Ford at a political rally with a Canadian flag

Ford Nation: How Populism Took Hold in Toronto

Populism is usually seen as the outgrowth of left-behind places, but Rob and Doug Ford’s rise happened in diverse, progressive Toronto.

A man carrying a young boy on his shoulders amid the fall foliage of New York's Central Park.

Which U.S. Cities Have the Most Families With Kids?

Spoiler alert: It’s simply not the case that families with kids have disappeared from urban America.

A car driving past a New Jersey location of LA Fitness.

The Geography of American Gym and Fitness-Center Brands

Gym and fitness-studio chains tend to specialize in either urban or suburban areas. But overall, they skew toward rich neighborhoods with lots of graduates, renters, and white people.

Women in a pilates class

Your Fitness Resolution Might Be Easier If You're Rich

The availability of exercise venues reflects broader divides of class and geography.

Home for sale signs in West London

How Machine Learning and AI Can Predict Gentrification

New research from the Urban Studies journal uses London as a test site to show how machine learning can predict which neighborhoods will gentrify next.

Traffic moving along Interstate 75 against the downtown skyline in Atlanta.

Fast-Growing Companies Prefer Vibrant Parts of Cities—and Suburbs

A new study finds that high-growth companies flock to neighborhoods that are more mixed-use and transit-accessible, whether in urban centers or suburbia.

The Metropolitan Opera House in New York

How Urban Core Amenities Drive Gentrification and Increase Inequality

A new study finds that as the rich move back to superstar cities' urban cores to gain access to unique amenities they drive low-income people out.

A "Virginia is for Amazon Lovers" sign at an HQ2 press conference

Mayors Should Take a Stand Against a Future Amazon HQ2

Calling on federal government to regulate economic incentives is a cop-out. It’s time for America’s big cities and mayors to stand up to companies like Amazon.

A vegetable farm next to high-rise apartments in Hong Kong.

Just How Much of the World Is Urban?

Experts at the European Commission assess the world as more urban than experts at the United Nations or New York University do. We need to resolve this debate.

A worker serves customers at a New York diner as the result of the 2016 U.S. presidential election is shown on a TV screen.

The Political Differences of the Creative, Service, and Working Classes

What do the three classes think about issues like gun control, immigration, women’s rights, and unionization?

View of traffic in Long Island City, Queens, looking over the bridge to Manhattan.

Amazon’s HQ2 Search Was About Specialized Talent

Amazon chose Long Island City and Crystal City based on talent. But talent isn’t generic: The search for HQ2 was about particular types of it.

Riders exit the Boston MBTA green line

Why Is Your State Red or Blue? Look to the Dominant Occupational Class

States with more working-class voters are solidly red; those with a dominant creative class are solidly blue; service-class heavy states aren’t easily defined.