Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate.

A man walks by a brightly colored mural of activist Malala Yousafzai in Bushwick, a neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York.

How Culture Shapes Economic Development

A new study, drawing on 1.5 million images of cultural spaces in London and New York, finds that cultural capital is a key contributor to urban economic growth.

The campus of Stanford University in California

The Paradox of Prosperity at America’s Universities

As they churn out the talent and technology that drive economic growth, universities also shape deepening urban inequality.

A cow stands in front of a barn painted with a U.S. flag

The 3 Rural Americas

Not all rural areas are declining: Some are thriving, while others are undergoing significant transitions.

A home for sale in the Sacramento area

Where the House-Price-to-Income Ratio Is Most Out of Whack

The rule of thumb is that the cost of your house should equal roughly 2.6 years of income. But in some U.S. cities, home prices are almost 10 times what the median household earns.

Maryland Governor Larry Hogan signs bills for Metro funding and Amazon incentives in Rockville on April 25.

Why Do Politicians Waste So Much Money on Corporate Incentives?

Political scientist Nathan Jensen answers questions about his new book, Incentives to Pander.

A person walks past the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

Revisiting the New Urban Crisis

The shift toward a more inclusive urbanism has begun. But it will require time, commitment from city institutions, and political agency at the local level.

A groundskeeper at a country club in Rochester, New York

The Jobs That Are Getting Priced Out of Superstar Cities

It’s not high costs alone that are pushing people out of expensive cities—whole categories of jobs are underrepresented there.

Job seekers at TechFair in Los Angeles

What’s Really Behind Economic Mobility?

The American Dream turns on where we live. But it’s job markets and marriage partners—not schools—that make the biggest difference in who climbs the economic ladder.

The competition for HQ2 has given Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos plenty of reason to smile.

The Hypocrisy of Amazon’s HQ2 Process

Amazon set up its HQ2 bidding war for maximum manipulation of North America’s cities—and the company doesn’t seem to be following its own selection criteria closely.

New college graduates in caps and gowns

How College Grads Drive Up Urban Rents

In cities that gain college graduates, wages rise but so do rents, resulting in a cost burden for the least advantaged.

A home for rent in Los Angeles

The Great Housing Reset

The rise of renting in the U.S. isn’t just about high housing prices, or preferences for city living, but about the flexibility to compete in today’s economy.

A barn decorated with a mural inspired by Grant Wood's painting "American Gothic" in Mt. Vernon, Iowa

The Rise of the Rural Creative Class

A growing body of research shows that innovative businesses are common in rural areas, and rural innovation gets a boost from the arts.

A poll volunteer hands out an "I Voted" sticker during the 2016 U.S. presidential election in Stillwater, Oklahoma.

How Unhappiness Helped Elect Trump

A new study suggests that many Americans’ dissatisfaction and lack of optimism had a role in electing President Trump.

New luxury condo towers rise on 'Billionaire's Row' in Manhattan.

What's Manhattan's Land Worth? Try 'Canada's Entire GDP'

A new study traces the astonishing increase in the value of Manhattan’s land since 1950.

The central business district in Beijing, one of the world's emerging tech hubs

The Rise of the Rest (of the World)

American cities still have the edge when it comes to high-tech startups and venture capital, but other parts of the world are rapidly catching up.

Peter Calthorpe

Peter Calthorpe Is Still Fighting Sprawl—With Software

In an interview, the leading New Urbanist Peter Calthorpe discusses autonomous rapid transit, Buckminster Fuller, NIMBYism, and his new urban-planning software.

A home for sale in the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco

Is Housing Inequality the Main Driver of Economic Inequality?

A growing body of research suggests that inequality in the value of Americans’ homes is a major factor—perhaps the key factor—in the country’s economic divides.

Villa 31, an informal settlement in Buenos Aires

The Global Housing Crisis

Scarce, unaffordable housing is not a local problem in a few places, but is baked into the 21st-century global city. It’s time for cities, nations, and global leaders to start acting like it.

How Your Social Class Affects Where You'll Move

Socioeconomic sorting at the metropolitan level is making America more polarized, an economist finds.

Which U.S. Cities Are Most Food Truck-Friendly?

A new study breaks down where the administrative hurdles to opening a restaurant on wheels are the worst.