Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate and visiting fellow at Florida International University.

A modest one-story home and a driveway leading to a garage behind it.

What Makes Silicon Valley Different?

Historian Margaret O’Mara talks about her new book The Code and how Silicon Valley has maintained its competitive edge in high tech.

Tents with the Honolulu skyline behind them

Where Is the Best City to Live, Based on Salaries and Cost of Living?

Paychecks stretch the furthest in smaller cities for most workers, but techies continue to do best in larger, more expensive cities.

The Future of the Middle Class Depends on Upgrading Service Jobs

More than 70 million Americans hold low-wage, precarious service jobs. We must make these jobs a pathway to the middle class.

The Atlanta skyline with Mercedes-Benz Stadium

Ranking Cities by the New Urban Crisis

When cities rather than metros are measured by inequality, economic segregation, and affordability, the New Urban Crisis has surprising hits and misses.

A woman using a smartphone and laptop in an urban cafe.

The Changing Geography of America’s Creative Class

Washington, D.C., has the highest share of creative-class workers among large U.S. cities, but Miami’s creative class is growing faster.

Graduates react near the end of commencement exercises at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.

Where Do College Grads Live? The Top and Bottom U.S. Cities

Even though superstar hubs top the list of the most educated cities, other cities are growing their share at a much faster rate.

An aerial photo of downtown Miami.

The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

The Innovations of the Creative Class Affect a Rural Area’s Fortunes

A new study measures innovation and shows that when found in rural areas, it is tied to significant presence of the creative class.

Two women wave their phones in the air at a crowded music festival.

The Rise, and Urbanization, of Big Music Festivals

The legacy of hippie Woodstock is the modern music-festival economy: materialist, driven by celebrities and social media, and increasingly urban.

The Benefits of High-Tech Job Growth Don’t Trickle Down

A new study from the U.K. finds that although high-tech and digital industries spur job growth, less-skilled workers don’t even get spillover benefits.

A close-up of a sink

Where Americans Lack Running Water, Mapped

“Plumbing poverty”—a lack of access to running water, a flush toilet, and an indoor bath or shower—is skewed across racial and socioeconomic lines.

The Double Whammy: Housing and Income Inequality

New research shows how housing and income inequality reinforce one another, effectively splitting the U.S. into two different economies.

Young children line up in the hallway outside a classroom in an elementary school.

Why Children Born in Big Cities Earn More As Adults

Just being born in a big city has a positive effect on later-life wages, new research finds.

SEPTA trains in Philadelphia

Startups Are Abandoning Suburbs for Cities With Good Transit

A new study finds that new business startups are choosing cities with good public transportation options over the traditional suburban locations.

People wait in line, holding tote bags in the sunshine, outside a job fair.

How 3 Skill Sets Explain U.S. Economic Geography

Metro areas in the U.S. with higher cognitive and people skills, versus motor skills, perform better economically and are more resilient during downturns.

A crowded street outside in Boston

Surveillance Cameras Debunk the Bystander Effect

A new study uses camera footage to track the frequency of bystander intervention in heated incidents in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.                            

The Cincinnati skyline and river

Maps Reveal Where the Creative Class Is Growing

“The rise of the rest” may soon become a reality as once-lagging cities see growth of creative class employment.

Two men with yellow hard hats surrounded by technology boxes

Job Density Is Increasing in Superstar Cities and Sprawling in Others

A study finds job density increased in the U.S. over a 10-year period. But four cities: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle, accounted for most of it.

At an NBA game, a player attempts to block a player from the rival team who has the ball.

NBA Free Agents Cluster in Superstar Cities, Too

Pro basketball follows the winner-take-all geography of America as a whole, with free agents gravitating to New York, L.A., and other big cities.

A man walks by an abandoned home in Youngstown, Ohio

How Some Shrinking Cities Are Still Prospering

A study finds that some shrinking cities are prosperous areas with smaller, more-educated populations. But they also have greater levels of income inequality.