Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate and visiting fellow at Florida International University.

A crowded room of residents attend a local public forum in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Are Local Politics As Polarized As National? Depends on the Issue.

Republican or Democrat, even if we battle over national concerns, research finds that in local politics, it seems we can all just get along—most of the time.

Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California

America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.

A photo of couples dancing in a park.

The Geography of Online Dating

When looking for love, most people don’t look far from home. That's what a big-data analysis of interactions on a dating site revealed.

A photo of empty storefronts in a small American town.

How ‘Heartland Visas’ Could Reduce Geographic Inequality

Place-based immigrant visas could help revitalize America’s left-behind cities and regions, economic researchers say in a new report.

A school bus driving through a suburb.

How Families With Kids Drive Suburban Segregation

The old divide between family-friendly suburbs and childless city living is fading. The new divide is within the suburbs themselves.

People handle guns on display at a show in Las Vegas.

The 3 Gun-Control Laws That Work Best in the U.S.

States with stricter gun-control laws have fewer homicides, especially when they’re used in combination, according to a new study.

A blue, red, and gray map indicating income inequality in 2013

How the 1 Percent Is Pulling America’s Cities and Regions Apart

America’s growing geographic divide derives from economic inequality, especially the tremendous gains of the 1 percent.

A photo of crowds at Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

The Economic Power of American Arts and Culture

The contribution of culture and art to the U.S. economy is bigger than the economic output of Sweden or Switzerland, according to a new report.

Students cheer at Kalamazoo Central High School graduation.

A Guide to Successful Place-Based Economic Policies

A new Upjohn Institute report documents four key pillars that can guide successful place-based economic development and local job growth.

How Poor Americans Get Exploited by Their Landlords

American landlords derive more profit from renters in low-income neighborhoods, researchers Matthew Desmond and Nathan Wilmers find.

A cyclist rides through a desert park and nature preserve in Phoenix.

The Inequality of America’s Parks and Green Space

New research finds that income, education, and race are correlated with access to green space across and within U.S. metro areas.

People in New York City

How Density Can Deter Growth in America’s Largest Metros

A new report examines why the largest U.S. metros actually face population decline.

A suburban Atlanta house with downtown skyscrapers in the background

Urban, Suburban, and Rural: We’re More Alike Than We Think

No matter the nature of the locale—urban, suburban, or rural—differences stem more from who we are than what we want in our communities.

Large houses line a street in suburban Ohio.

The Persistent Economic Advantage of America’s Suburbs

A new study finds that suburban neighborhoods outperform urban ones across the board.

A map of geographic mobility in the United States

The Geography of America’s Mobile and ‘Stuck,’ Mapped

The United States is facing a new class distinction: those who are mobile across state lines, and those who are stuck.

A map of economic mega-regions around the world

The Real Powerhouses That Drive the World’s Economy

It’s not nation states or even cities, but mega-regions—combinations of multiple metro areas—that are the real forces powering the global economy.

A photo of a train stopping in downtown Miami.

6 Rules for Better, More Inclusive Economic Development in Cities

Urban leaders need to kick the incentive habit and take a more inclusive approach to growing local economies.

A photo of Anne Wojcicki, CEO and co-founder of 23andMe, speaking at a conference.

Where Women Startup Founders Are Gaining Ground

The share of VC-backed startups with women founders has grown dramatically, but Silicon Valley lags behind other hubs.

Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation

Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.

Amazon’s HQ2 Fiasco Will Cost the Company More Than It Costs New York

The mega-company has bucked dealing reasonably with New York City, Seattle, and any community that asks them to pay for its freight.