Richard Florida

Richard Florida is a co-founder and editor at large of CityLab and a senior editor at The Atlantic. He is a university professor in the University of Toronto’s School of Cities and Rotman School of Management, and a distinguished fellow at New York University’s Schack Institute of Real Estate and visiting fellow at Florida International University.

The Cincinnati skyline and river

Maps Reveal Where the Creative Class Is Growing

“The rise of the rest” may soon become a reality as once-lagging cities see growth of creative class employment.

Two men with yellow hard hats surrounded by technology boxes

Job Density Is Increasing in Superstar Cities and Sprawling in Others

A study finds job density increased in the U.S. over a 10-year period. But four cities: New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Seattle, accounted for most of it.

At an NBA game, a player attempts to block a player from the rival team who has the ball.

NBA Free Agents Cluster in Superstar Cities, Too

Pro basketball follows the winner-take-all geography of America as a whole, with free agents gravitating to New York, L.A., and other big cities.

A man walks by an abandoned home in Youngstown, Ohio

How Some Shrinking Cities Are Still Prospering

A study finds that some shrinking cities are prosperous areas with smaller, more-educated populations. But they also have greater levels of income inequality.

Aerial view of new single-family homes on curving streets.

How Should We Define the Suburbs?

Based on census boundaries, ways of life, and physical characteristics, respectively, three new definitions offer a composite portrait of American suburbia.

A pile of old, used cell phones

Are Drug Deals Via Text the Key to the Murder Decline?

A new study finds that cell phones played a significant role in reducing homicides in big cities by limiting face-to-face contact.

Writers Are More Prolific When They Cluster

A new study finds that British and Irish writers clustered in 18th- and 19th-century London and were more productive as a result.

A line of moving trucks outside an apartment complex

Why Some Americans Won’t Move, Even for a Higher Salary

A new study identifies powerful psychological factors that connect people to places, and that mean more to them than money.

Young women and men chat over beers in a bar.

Young People’s Love of Cities Isn’t a Passing Fad

New research suggests that younger Americans’ preference for urban living is real and not wearing off.

A woman walks down a city street across from a new apartment and condominium building.

How Housing Supply Became the Most Controversial Issue in Urbanism

New research has kicked off a war of words among urban scholars over the push for upzoning to increase cities’ housing supply.

A map of the money service-class workers have left over after paying for housing

Blue-Collar and Service Workers Fare Better Outside Superstar Cities

How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For working-class and service workers in superstar cities, the affordable housing crisis hits harder.

Alicia Glen speaks into a microphone at a podium inside a tent.

‘You Can't Just Show Up’: Alicia Glen on Amazon's Queens Defeat

In an interview, the former deputy mayor under Bill de Blasio says diversity is the key to New York’s growth: “Even with all of our warts, we’re the best.”

Tourists walk along the High Line in Manhattan, New York City

The Beauty Premium: How Urban Beauty Affects Cities’ Economic Growth

A study finds that the more beautiful a city is, the more successful it is at attracting jobs and new residents, including highly educated and affluent ones.

A photo of construction cranes and tall buildings in downtown Los Angeles.

‘Build More Housing’ Is No Match for Inequality

A new analysis finds that liberalizing zoning rules and building more won’t solve the urban affordability crisis, and could exacerbate it.  

Cars line up in traffic on a freeway in Los Angeles

Long School Commutes Are Terrible for Kids

Children who live farther away from their schools get significantly less sleep and exercise, new research shows.

A photo of graduating college seniors in caps and gowns during commencement.

The Geography of Brain Drain in America

Across the United States, there are fewer states gaining brainpower than draining it, according to a new report from the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee.

Trump Towers I, II and III in Sunny Isles Beach, a suburb of Miami.

Will Miami’s Growth Be Cut Short by Sea-Level Rise?

A conversation with sociologist Alejandro Portes about his new book: Is Miami a global city, or a superstar Latin-American city? And is it going to sink?

A cashier stands behind the counter at a lottery store.

In Praise of a Higher Minimum Wage

Raising the minimum wage helps low-paid workers without damaging the broader economy, the authors of two new research papers find.

A crowded room of residents attend a local public forum in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Are Local Politics As Polarized As National? Depends on the Issue.

Republican or Democrat, even if we battle over national concerns, research finds that in local politics, it seems we can all just get along—most of the time.

Tech workers sit around a table on their laptops in San Francisco, California

America’s Tech Hubs Still Dominate, But Some Smaller Cities Are Rising

Despite established urban tech hubs, some smaller cities are attracting high-tech jobs with lower living costs, unique talent pools, and geographic diversity.