Robinson Meyer

Robinson Meyer

Robinson Meyer is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he covers technology.

A Texas State Park police officer walks on the cracked and drought-wracked lakebed of O.C. Fisher Lake, in San Angelos, Texas

Climate Change Will Intensify Inequality in the U.S.

Global warming will aggravate regional disparities and the South will bear the worst of the costs, according to a revolutionary new economic assessment.

Google's New Product Puts Peer Pressure to a Sunny Use

The company’s “Project Sunroof” now shows you which of your friends have already put solar panels on their roof.

A Visual Search Engine for the Entire Planet

Descartes Labs lets you point-and-hop between features in China and the United States.

The Town Where People Clash With Polar Bears

Arctic warming means more conflict between humans and the giant predators in Churchill, Manitoba.

Identifying Poverty From Space

As a country’s GDP increases, so does its nighttime luminosity.

A Major Earthquake in the Pacific Northwest Just Got More Likely

There is a 17 to 20 percent chance that northern Oregon will be hit by a magnitude-8 quake in the next 50 years.

What to Say When the Police Tell You to Stop Filming Them

First of all, they shouldn’t ask.

Don't Sensationalize That Big New Climate Paper

It's important to be clear about just what it says.

Why Are Government Weather Forecasts So Shouty?

They’re one of the best products put out by the NWS. But they have A CERTAIN STYLE.

Will More Local Newspapers Go Nonprofit?

It will likely depend on what happens to The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Daily News.

Police Video Is Never Enough

Would body cameras have made justice speedier for Laquan McDonald? Not without new laws.

The Dismal State of Police Body-Camera Laws

In some cities, it may be legal to use body cameras to track and profile people of color.

Visualizing the Arctic's Shrinking Sea Ice

A new map reveals how much the ocean’s ice has shrunk since the 1970s.

Film the Police

A new app makes it easier.

What Good Is a Video You Can't See?

Police body cameras are meant to be a tool of public accountability. But even experts can't agree on how to make sure that happens.

The Courage of Bystanders Who Press 'Record'

Police-worn body cameras may be necessary, but we still need citizens who are brave enough to capture video of conflict.

Further Proof That It's Hard to Be a Mets Fan

Facebook data of baseball allegiances shows the geography of fandom.

The Best Technology for Fighting Climate Change? Trees

Between now and 2050, forests are one of our 'most promising' geo-engineering tools.

A New Global Swarm of Weather-Sensing Satellites

Armed with tiny orbiting sensors, a startup plans to build the world's largest database of private weather data.

How One Small Idaho City Has Embraced Body Cameras

Police in Post Falls, Idaho, have been using body cams since 2007, and say the technology has improved their work.

What Firechat's Success in Hong Kong Means for a Global Internet

The app now connecting political protesters could soon connect people in the developing world.