Tanvi Misra

Tanvi Misra is a staff writer for CityLab covering immigrant communities, housing, economic inequality, and culture. She also authors Navigator, a weekly newsletter for urban explorers (subscribe here). Her work also appears in The Atlantic, NPR, and BBC.

Houston Mayor: I Don’t Want My City to Participate in Child Migrant Detention

“There comes a time when Americans, when Houstonians, when Texans have to say to those higher than ourselves: This is wrong. This is just wrong.”

Attendees at a "Sweat Crawl" through the boutique fitness studios of D.C.

I Survived D.C.’s First ‘Sweat Crawl’

“Forget what you’re going to be someday—you’re strong … today!”

Minimum Wages Can't Pay for a 2-Bedroom Apartment Anywhere

There isn’t a single state, city, or county in the U.S. where someone earning federal or state minimum wage for a 40-hour work week can afford a two-bedroom home at fair market rent.

Where Chicagoans Are Being Stopped and Frisked

A new data visualization allows for a detailed look at who’s being policed, where, and by whom.

University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing stands near a car after driver Samuel DuBose was allegedly pulled over and shot during a traffic stop in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Is It Time to Reconsider Traffic Stops?

What researchers found after analyzing data gathered from 20 million stops in North Carolina.

Why Cities Should Support, Not Exclude, Street Vendors

In developing countries, informal workers make up 50 to 80 percent of the urban workforce. Keeping them locked out of prosperity is bad for everyone, according to a new report.

Where the Prison Population Is Rising

Overall, the prison population is decreasing, but in some states, it’s higher than ever. A new report looks at trends state by state.

A metal sculpture in the shape of a corn cob near a road in Iowa City, Iowa.

Rural and Urban America Have More in Common Than You Think

A new Pew Research Center survey shows where the geographical divide is overstated.

What Will It Take to Desegregate Chicago?

A new report offers a roadmap to inclusive growth.

Why Do So Many Young Adults Live With Their Parents?

For young black Americans, it’s because rents are too damn high: For white ones, it’s about jobs.

Inside the Massive U.S. 'Border Zone'

All of Michigan, D.C., and a large chunk of Pennsylvania are part of the area where Border Patrol has expanded search and seizure rights. Here's what it means to live or travel there.

A street in Fishtown, a neighborhood in Philadelphia that has experienced gentrification.

How Gentrification Affected Philadelphia's Homeowners

Tax delinquency rates rose with jumps in tax burdens, but relief programs for some owners helped mitigate the effect.

The Most Inclusive U.S. Cities, Mapped

A new report finds where post-1980 economic growth has been accompanied by inclusion of low-income residents and communities of color.

What Drives the Black-White Wealth Gap?

A new paper debunks various myths about the wealth gap between blacks and whites in the United States, and the methods for bridging it.

Community organizer John Comer reflects on the problems faced by the black communities in West Baltimore in front of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.

The Other Side of MLK Boulevard

In Baltimore, the road named for the slain civil rights icon brought suburbanites downtown—and displacement and isolation to the communities along its path.

The Case for a Black Census

A new project is intended to “give us a better sense of who black people are, where we are, and what we hope and dream for,” says Alicia Garza who also helped start the Black Lives Matter movement.