Tanvi Misra

Tanvi Misra is a staff writer for CityLab covering urban demographics, inequality, and culture. Her work also appears in The Atlantic, NPR, and BBC.

The Effect of Trump's Immigration Crackdown, in 3 Maps

New maps show that local sanctuary policies may have actually affected how many immigrants the Trump administration was able to arrest.

The State Laws That Might Prevent Another Charlottesville

A new legal analysis finds that all 50 states have language on the books that can be used to prevent violence by armed white supremacists and private militias.

Screenshot of the Block Club Chicago landing page.

A Shuttered Chicago News Outlet Reboots—With Blockchain

DNAInfo has now returned as Block Club Chicago, a neighborhood news platform run on blockchain technology.

The Rise of 'Digital Poorhouses'

Seemingly benign and even well-meaning high-tech tools are evolving the ways in which government criminalizes and punishes the poor.

Does Inviting Amazon to Your Hood Really Create Jobs?

A new study calls into question the net benefit of Amazon warehouses for cities.

San Juan Mayor to Trump: 'Things Are Not OK'

“The botched effort of this administration really has caused lasting pain and even more havoc than the hurricanes themselves,” Carmen Yulín Cruz tells CityLab ahead of the president’s first State of The Union address.

Rent Control: a Reckoning

The eventual drawbacks of rent restriction policies appear to outweigh the benefits to low-income individuals. So, is it time to reform them?

Immigrant supporters protest in Los Angeles in response to threats by the Trump administration.

How the DOJ Is Broadening Its Attack on Sanctuary Cities

Its newest round of letters to 23 jurisdictions appears to be a “fishing expedition,” one expert says.

Where Amazon HQ2 Could Worsen Affordability the Most

Some of the cities dubbed finalists in Amazon’s headquarters search are likely to see a greater strain on their housing market, a new analysis finds.

Immigration Raids, Coming to a Store Near You

Immigration officials said purpose of their raids on 7-Elevens was to target employers. The evidence suggests otherwise.

Students sit in a library of UGent, Ghent University.

Is Your Librarian Racist?

Findings from a new study indicate that “black-sounding” names are less likely to get a reply from public service providers.

Conversations in a Divided Berlin

Several years into a new wave of refugees entering the city, the grassroots organizations that sprung up to meet their needs have become part of the fabric of the city.

The Local Fight to End Sexual Assault in Low-Wage Jobs

Hospitality and domestic workers suffer staggering rates of sexual harassment and assault. But they are among women still largely omitted from the #MeToo movement—and many federal protections.

A U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer helps a passenger navigate one of the new facial recognition kiosks before a flight to Tokyo in July 2017, in Houston.

In 9 U.S. Cities, Airport Security Is Now Scanning Your Face

“DHS should not be scanning the faces of Americans as they depart on international flights—but DHS is doing it anyway,” warns a new report that finds facial recognition practices may be violating the law.

Durham's Growing Pains

Durham, North Carolina was once a tobacco hub. Mayor William Bell talks about on his city’s post-industrial transformation—and the challenges that come with it.

How One City Approaches Its Amazon Bid Through an Equity Lens

Austin’s first chief equity officer on improving equal access to housing, zoning, and economic benefit.