Tanvi Misra

Tanvi Misra is a staff writer for CityLab covering immigrant communities, housing, economic inequality, and culture. She also authors Navigator, a weekly newsletter for urban explorers (subscribe here). Her work also appears in The Atlantic, NPR, and BBC.

Why D.C. Drowned Out the White Nationalists

The second Unite the Right rally saw an emaciated turnout. But residents of Washington, D.C., have something of a tradition of showing up to oppose white supremacists.

Why Philadelphia Is on the Federal Government’s Shaming List

“To be quite honest it kind of feels like they’re a bit obsessed with the city,” an immigrants’ rights activist said of the Department of Justice.

The author of Seattle's "democracy voucher" initiative holding up a $25 voucher.

More Cities Want to Embrace ‘Democracy Vouchers’

Following Seattle’s example, other cities want to give voters cash vouchers to donate to local candidates.

As Chicago's majority-Hispanic Pilsen neighborhood gentrifies, it has become one of the sites for battles over affordable housing.

How Chicago’s Aldermen Help Keep It Segregated

For decades, aldermen have used their “aldermanic prerogative” to reject affordable housing development, confining the city’s low-income residents, who are mostly black and brown, to a few areas of the city, a new report says.

Lessons from New York’s Immigration Raids

Despite New York’s policies to protect immigrants, new analyses of federal immigration enforcement show how and why it is in many ways becoming more aggressive.

Bike Advocacy’s Blind Spot

The biking community is overwhelmingly concerned with infrastructure. For urban anthropologist Adonia Lugo, that’s an equity problem.

How Your Neighborhood Private Immigrant Prison Influences Its Members of Congress

A new study finds that lawmakers hailing from districts with private immigration jails are more likely to introduce harsh immigration policy.

Where Cities Help Detain Immigrants

Contracts that rent local beds to ICE for immigrant detention are spread out across the country—including in liberal counties.

A tranquil jog.

He’s Running; Interrupt Him

If mayors don’t like being interrupted on their jogs, they may want to invest in a treadmill.

Where Will the Migrant Kids Go?

After the executive order signed by the Trump administration, the situation for kids and families detained at the border is even more uncertain than it was before. But here are some scenarios.

Houston Mayor: I Won’t Be an Enabler of Migrant Family Separation

“There comes a time when Americans, when Houstonians, when Texans have to say to those higher than ourselves: This is wrong. This is just wrong.”

Attendees at a "Sweat Crawl" through the boutique fitness studios of D.C.

I Survived D.C.’s First ‘Sweat Crawl’

“Forget what you’re going to be someday—you’re strong … today!”

Minimum Wages Can't Pay for a 2-Bedroom Apartment Anywhere

There isn’t a single state, city, or county in the U.S. where someone earning federal or state minimum wage for a 40-hour work week can afford a two-bedroom home at fair market rent.

Where Chicagoans Are Being Stopped and Frisked

A new data visualization allows for a detailed look at who’s being policed, where, and by whom.

University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing stands near a car after driver Samuel DuBose was allegedly pulled over and shot during a traffic stop in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Is It Time to Reconsider Traffic Stops?

What researchers found after analyzing data gathered from 20 million stops in North Carolina.

Why Cities Should Support, Not Exclude, Street Vendors

In developing countries, informal workers make up 50 to 80 percent of the urban workforce. Keeping them locked out of prosperity is bad for everyone, according to a new report.