Tanvi Misra

Tanvi Misra is a staff writer for CityLab covering immigrant communities, housing, economic inequality, and culture. She also authors Navigator, a weekly newsletter for urban explorers (subscribe here). Her work also appears in The Atlantic, NPR, and BBC.

Yes, 311 Nuisance Calls Are Climbing in Gentrifying Neighborhoods

A new analysis by the Science vs. podcast team crunches the numbers on which New York City blocks are seeing spikes in calls complaining about other residents.

When Your Block Is Being Watched

In her new documentary, journalist Assia Boundaoui explores the effect of constant surveillance on her predominantly Muslim neighborhood in suburban Illinois.

A shopper in Boston's Jamaica Plain, which, like many urban neighborhoods, has experienced dramatic demographic shifts in recent decades.

When Neighborhood Diversity Meets White Anxiety

The perception of demographic change can be more powerful than the reality of it, according to new research on how white residents can feel threatened by racial and ethnic shifts.

A worker at an Amazon fulfillment center in Baltimore.

A Higher Minimum Wage Could Lower Recidivism

New research shows that boosting paychecks could help people stay out of jail.

The Neighborhoods That Offer a ‘Bargain’ on Upward Mobility

New research shows that communities just miles apart that look similar may offer vastly different chances to climb up the economic ladder.

The Rapid Rise of the ‘Anti-Sanctuary’ City

A new report by a government watchdog finds that a controversial program that allows local police to participate in immigration enforcement is spreading—but without proper training and oversight.

Why Blocking Poor Immigrants Could Be Very Costly

A new DHS “public charge” rule seeks to bar low-income immigrants if they’re likely to use food stamps and public housing. But critics say that it’s not about saving money.

A worker repairs a Texas home after Hurricane Harvey in September 2017.

Why Hurricanes Hit Immigrants Hardest

A new report details the challenges that Houston’s immigrant population faced after Harvey—and offers a glimpse of what might await residents of the Carolinas after Florence.

When Transit Agencies Spy on Riders

For months, the Bay Area’s transit agency sent license plate information to federal immigration authorities, violating its own “sanctuary” policy.

The cooling tower of a nuclear power plant.

Nuclear Power Plants Brace for Hurricane Florence

The Union of Concerned Scientists has questioned whether two plants, in North Carolina and Virginia, are ready for a megastorm.

A family enjoy popsicles at Chicago's Navy Pier.

The Trouble With TIF

Cities love to use Tax Increment Financing to boost development. Should they?

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and his wife Amy Rule attend the 2013 presidential inauguration

Chicago, After Rahm

Campaign insiders offer clues to the reasons for Emanuel’s startling announcement that he won’t seek reelection as mayor. (Others just say “good riddance.”)

A person walks with floods and grounded airplanes in the background.

The Kerala Floods: A Disastrous Consequence of Unchecked Urbanization

Kerala's busiest airport reopened this week, but the conditions that led to the deadly and destructive floods in the southern Indian state remain.

Workers’ Rights, Silicon Valley-Style

In the technology industry, labor organizing can get tricky.

This photo of Ieshia Evans meeting police in full riot gear in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, went viral in 2016.

Militarization of Local Police Isn’t Making Anyone Safer

Recent research shows that not only are militarized squads used disproportionately in communities of color, but contrary to claims, they reduce neither crime nor police injury or death.

Two women in front of an arriving Metro train.

Commute Discrimination Is a Thing

A recent study finds that employers hiring for low-wage jobs in Washington, D.C., are more likely to call back applicants who live nearby.

A woman holds her granddaughter at the Care Harbor clinic in Los Angeles, California, October 2015.

After Job Loss, Living Near Parents Helps Adults Recover

According to a new study, it can take decades for someone who was laid off to make up lost earnings, but for those who live near parents who provide childcare, that time is halved.