Tanvi Misra

Tanvi Misra is a staff writer for CityLab covering immigrant communities, housing, economic inequality, and culture. She also authors Navigator, a weekly newsletter for urban explorers (subscribe here). Her work also appears in The Atlantic, NPR, and BBC.

A photo of a Somali refugee camp at Liboi, Kenya, in 1992.

The ‘Human Archipelago’ Has No Borders

A book on global migrants and refugees by novelist Teju Cole and photographer Fazal Sheikh explores the agency and humanity of the displaced and dispossessed.

A photo of passersby walking under a surveillance camera that is part of a facial recognition technology test at Berlin Suedkreuz station in Berlin, Germany.

The Bay Area’s Spy Camera Ban Is Only the Beginning

San Francisco just became the first city to ban use of facial recognition technology by government entities. Oakland may be next.

HUD Rule Targeting Immigrant Families Could Evict 55,000 Children

A Trump administration regulation targeting undocumented immigrants seeks to boot families if even one person is not eligible to receive public housing aid.

a photo of a poster representing facial recognition at a security conference in Beijing, China, which has aggressively invested in the controversial technology.

The Tenants Fighting Back Against Facial Recognition Technology

The landlord of a rent-stabilized apartment in Brooklyn wants to install a facial recognition security system, sparking a debate about privacy and surveillance.

Electricians install solar panels on a roof for Arizona Public Service company in Goodyear, Arizona.

A Bottom-Line Case for the Green New Deal: The Jobs Pay More

A Brookings report finds that jobs in the clean energy, efficiency, and environmental sectors offer higher salaries than the U.S. average.

Maria Romano stands behind one of her three children, Jennifer, 10, as she gets something to eat in their Harlem apartment in New York Thursday, June 3, 2005

Why HUD Wants to Restrict Assistance for Immigrants

A proposal by Ben Carson’s agency would eject immigrant families from public housing to make way for the "most vulnerable." Housing advocates aren't buying it.

A photo of a model of a church created by a young person held at Tornillo detention facility in El Paso, when it was operational.

What Do Migrant Kids See When They Visualize 'Home'?

A new exhibit in El Paso showcases works of art created by children detained in a massive border encampment of migrants in Tornillo, Texas.

a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.

What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.

From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.

a photo of girl sitting in the arms of a statue in Rittenhouse Square in Philadelphia.

What Happens to Community Bonds When a Neighborhood Gentrifies

A study of demographic changes in Philadelphia neighborhoods finds that an influx of more-affluent newcomers can erode community ties—or strengthen them.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents serve an employment audit notice at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Los Angeles

Are California's Police Departments Defying Its Sanctuary Law?

Here’s how immigration enforcement changes when a whole state tries to become a sanctuary.

A photo of a new subdivision of high-end suburban homes in Highland, Maryland.

Unpacking the Power of Privileged Neighborhoods

A new study shows that growing up in an affluent community brings “compounding privileges” and higher educational attainment—especially for white residents.

A photo of murals on homes in Medellin, Colombia

The Secret Ingredient of Resilient Cities: Culture

Investing in cultural cohesion and preservation can help rebuild cities devastated by war or natural disasters, says a new World Bank report.

a map of Boston's racial diversity

The 'Atlas of Inequality’ Maps Micro-Level Segregation

MIT Media Lab’s new interactive “Atlas of Inequality” shows that “segregation is not just about where you live, but what you do.”

a photo of a foreclosed home in Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011.

Does Foreclosure Affect How We Vote?

A new study explores the relationship between housing distress and voting shifts at the neighborhood level in Maricopa County, Arizona.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez listens

Did AOC’s Questions on Trump’s Real Estate Valuations Unlock His Tax Returns?

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez grilled Michael Cohen on the real estate dealings of Donald Trump. Cohen’s replies may open access to Trump's elusive tax returns.