The Seductive Power of a Suburban Utopia

Serenbe, an intentional community outside Atlanta, promises urban pleasures without the messiness of city life.

The Latest Supervillain Attacking Batgirl's Gotham City: Gentrification

Batgirl author Hope Larson talks about the changing face of Burnside, Gotham City's Brooklyn, where tech incubators and housing affordability are bigger threats than even the Penguin and Harley Quinn.

A tall building with a colorful mural of geometric triangles painted on the side.

What Murals Can Tell Cleveland About Itself

Inspired by a 1973 arts program, a new triennial aims to make the city “a living museum of contemporary abstraction” and start a few conversations along the way.

An 'Instant Bridge' Collapses Near Miami, and Many Questions Remain

Florida International University’s new pedestrian bridge was state-of-the-art. On Thursday, the new span failed, killing six.

MapLab: When Women Map the World

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Los Angeles City Hall, as seen from refurbished Grand Park

Why L.A. Just Appointed a Design Czar

Architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne has become the city’s first chief design officer, tasked with making sure the development juggernaut doesn’t get ahead of urban-design principles.  

A young refugee from Kosovo stands in front of a map of Hungary with her teacher.

Who Maps the World?

Too often, men. And money. But a team of OpenStreetMap users is working to draw new cartographic lines, making maps that more accurately—and equitably—reflect our space.

Line drawings of Pseudo-Georgian buildings.

An Artistic Twist on London's Pseudo-Georgian Architecture

A photogenic and tongue-in-cheek look at the commonly reviled design trend that signifies London’s luxury housing boom.

Design for an accessory dwelling unit in Portland, Oregon

Portland's 'Granny Flats' Get an Affordable Boost

A new startup pays the upfront cost of a backyard dwelling in exchange for some of the rent it generates.

A flock of birds flies past the Gateway Arch.

The Gateway Arch, a Global Icon, Reconnects to St. Louis

St. Louis’ Gateway Arch once stood in splendid isolation. A new $380-million renovation of its grounds brings it closer to downtown.

Virtual public art that has been vandalized.

Who's in Charge of the Augmented City?

So far, major forays into our augmented world have been pretty harmless. But with technological advancements and unchecked intrusions by private companies, the future could be terrifying.

One-way signs in the financial district in New York City

Do Two-Way Streets Help a City's Economy?

There’s more than one way for neighborhoods to respond to two-way street conversions, new research suggests.

John Portman posing in front of architectural models inside his office.

Making Sense of John Portman

Harvard’s Mohsen Mostafavi talks about Portman’s America and Other Speculations.

Cabrini-Green, foreground and mid-photo, seen against the Chicago skyline in 1996

The Rise and Fall of American Public Housing

In High-Risers, Ben Austen recounts the hopes, travails, and vilification of Chicago’s Cabrini-Green.

Trump's Tariffs Dim the Prospects for Trump's Wall

In a protectionist double-whammy, tariffs will make steel for infrastructure more expensive, while a crackdown on waivers will make U.S. steel mandatory.

How to Care for Your Portman Hotel

Architects chime in on how to make the right interventions inside and out of the late developer-architect’s distinct buildings.

MapLab: Snap by Snap, the Teen-Led Fight For Gun Reform

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Three different perspectives of a Modernist skyscraper

A Female Architect's 'Post-War Miracle' No Match for New Zoning

Natalie de Blois rarely received her due during a 50-year career. Now, a new zoning law in Manhattan’s Midtown East is helping a bank tear down one of her greatest achievements.

Members of the Düzce Solidarity Housing Cooperative at the project site, including Sami Kılıç (center, with dog) and Safiye Alkaya (second row, in gray cardigan)

The 'Most Hopeful' New Housing in Turkey

Twenty years after being displaced by an earthquake, families in Düzce, Turkey, are getting homes that they helped design and build themselves.

New York Needs Gordon Matta-Clark Now More Than Ever

A new retrospective at the Bronx Museum highlights the legendary artist’s ability to bring disparate communities together in the spirit of radical creation.

Modernism in London's 'Metro-Land'

Linked to the urban core by state-of-the-art electric trains by 1900, this area was in many ways a harbinger of a cleaner, brighter future.