Central Park REUTERS/Jeff Christensen

From a pedestrian expansion of the Verrazano bridge to a new entrance for Central Park, the best concepts from this year's Urban Design Week

This summer the Institute for Urban Design asked New Yorkers to submit ideas for making the city's public spaces "smarter, more beautiful and livable." Some 500 responses later, the institute then asked designers from around the world to shape these raw ideas into concrete projects for the city. The results of this "collaborative re-imagining" of New York were revealed during Urban Design Week, which came to a close on Tuesday, with 10 entries declared collective "winners."

A complete roster of the concepts has been compiled into a book, The Atlas of Possibility for the Future of New York, available for purchase, but the institute has agreed to give Atlantic Cities readers a free preview of the winning entries. So here, in alphabetical order, are ten possible glimpses into the future of New York.

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