Philadelphia tops the regular season attendance list for the first time in franchise history

Major League Baseball's regular season drew to a wild close last night, leaving a small fraction of teams still in the hunt for a World Series spot. As you gear up for playoff madness, take a moment to compare your team's fate with this year's regular season attendance record. Philadelphia came out on top for the first time ever in the history of the franchise with 3,680,718 total fans and a per-game average of 45,441 at Citizens Bank Park, besting the Yankees who came in second with 3,653,680 fans, averaging 45,107 fans per game. At the bottom of the list? Oakland, with a relatively paltry 1,476,792 fans and a game average of 18,232.

Altogether, the 30 clubs of the MLB drew 73,425,568 fans in the 2011 regular season, marking the fifth highest attendance in the sport's history and the most since the 2008 season (78,588,004).

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