Fairmount Park in Riverside, Calif. (Courtesy APA)

30 examples of great places in American cities from the American Planning Association

October is National Community Planning Month, which means the American Planning Association has once again released its annual Great Places lists. This year, the APA has honored ten projects each in three categories: Great Neighborhoods, Great Streets, and Great Public Spaces.

There's no theme or unifying thread behind the APA's picks. Rather, as spokesperson Denny Johnson explains, the association just picks a wide variety of "really good, high quality places." Among the highlights from this year's selections: Nashville's Bicentennial Capitol Mall State Park; Providence, Rhode Island's historic College Hill neighborhood; St. Louis's revitalized Washington Avenue; Tacoma, Washington's Point Defiance old-growth forest and park; Colorado Springs, Colorado's Garden of the Gods Park; and Tulsa's Swan Lake.

Check out the slideshows below for this year's winners, along with the APA's reasons for picking them. They're not ranked in any particular order, nor are they necessarily brand new projects:



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