Flickr user: "raindog" under a Creative Commons License

Which city hall buildings manage to capture something specific about a city's culture?

City Halls serve a critical role in hosting municipal offices and services, but they are almost as important architecturally, as they leave a visual legacy for the city they represent. San Diego's mayor is lobbying to build a new one, Las Vegas will see its new one open in 2012, and Rotterdam has chosen Rem Koolhaas' design for its new city hall. We looked around the world to find city halls that were architecturally unique whether it be in scale, materials, or just how they relate to their surroundings. 

Lead image of London's city hall via Flickr user raindog

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