Flickr user: "Arthur Chapman" under a Creative Commons License

Whether it's a fun slogan or an unusual design, these signs help their towns stand out

Popular vacation destinations like Las Vegas and Hollywood use iconic signs to announce their presence to incoming tourists, but these places are so famous, the typical visitor hardly needs the visual reminder. Smaller towns across the U.S. and Canada have a heavier burden when it comes to making a lasting impression in a single sign. Sometimes it's the design, sometimes it's the slogan, but these welcome signs add an extra layer of curiosity, or at least charm, for those who pass through these less famous locales. 

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. an aerial photo of urban traffic at night
    Transportation

    The Surprisingly High-Stakes Fight Over a Traffic-Taming ‘Digital Twin’

    Why are some mobility experts spooked by this plan to develop a data standard that would allow cities to build a real-time traffic control system?

  2. A NASA rendering of a moon base with lunar rover from 1986.
    Life

    We Were Promised Moon Cities

    It’s been 50 years since Apollo 11 put humans on the surface of the moon. Why didn’t we stay and build a more permanent lunar base? Lots of reasons.

  3. a photo of the First Pasadena State Bank building, designed by Texas modernist architects MacKie and Kamrath. It will be demolished on July 21.
    Design

    The Lonely Death of a South Texas Skyscraper

    The First Pasadena State Bank, a 12-story modernist tower inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright, has dominated this small town near Houston since 1962.

  4. SEPTA trains in Philadelphia
    Transportation

    Startups Are Abandoning Suburbs for Cities With Good Transit

    A new study finds that new business startups are choosing cities with good public transportation options over the traditional suburban locations.

  5. The facade of a building in Manhattan, with an A/C unit in every window.
    Environment

    8 Charts on How Americans Use Air Conditioning

    The U.S. government’s long-running Residential Energy Consumption Survey includes a lot of data on our A/C habits—and some surprises.

×