The annual desert event is the ultimate temporary city

Every year, a city rises and falls in the desert. The annual Burning Man festival/event/community moves into an empty plot of desert and grows into a temporary tent city of 50,000 people. The Architect’s Newspaper points us to this cool time-lapse video of the city’s construction, life and demise.

Filmed at the 2011 event in late August and early September from a perch on a nearby hilltop, the video offers a wide-angle look at the temporary city’s construction and demolition. It tracks the development of Burning Man for nearly a month leading up to the week-long event, and more than a week after as it steadily grows in size and activity, then quickly dissipates and the desert landscape of northwest Nevada fades back in.

The build-up and break-down is really interesting to see in this compressed format, but maybe even more interesting is the flashes and movements of light at night, showing the concentrations of the event’s notorious proclivity for late-night fire-and-light displays.

Burning Man isn’t exactly a city, but it’s a lot like a city. Watching a city build up and disappear like this is a sight not often seen.

Video and still via YouTube user .

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