Turenscape

Part art, part crosswalk, these wild walkways would look at home in a museum

Close your eyes and picture the world's newest and most attractive bridges. Now open them quickly before Santiago Calatrava's massive portfolio hits you square in the face. Even for bridges built solely for pedestrians, Calatrava's extensive body of work is hard to avoid, his style influencing many contemporary bridge designers. 

We decided to search around the globe for exciting, new (and relatively obscure) pedestrian bridges that had their own unique style. Sure, some are cable suspended, white, or just elegant but each has its own distinct flavor that makes it worth showcasing. 

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