New York City DOT

New York unveils creative signs aimed at pedestrian safety

Oncoming cars rush

Each a 3-ton bullet.

And you, flesh and bone.

Janette Sadik-Kahn and the New York Department of Transporation succeed yet again in putting the fun in transportation. Bike lanes! Beach chairs in Times Square! Reduced vehicular traffic! Now they've launched Curbside Haiku [PDF], a project that takes poetry to the streets via traffic safety signs throughout New York City. To wit:

 

As the New York Times' City Blog reports (in haiku form, which I will not attempt here),

"At crash-prone crosswalks,

200 will be installed

(Two are in Spanish)... 

Look for them on poles 

from Bronx to Staten Island.

Twelve sites in total."

Designed by John Morse, the graphic signs evoke both Saul Bass and e.e. cummings. Indisuputably cool (you can buy one for yourself for $60), their capacity to keep pedestrians from texting while crossing remains to be seen. But given the deluge of visuals throughout the city, the relative subtlety of Morse's creations just might make them stand out in the crowd.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. People eat and drink coffee inside a small coffeehouse.
    Life

    Gentrification Is Hurting Kuala Lumpur's Iconic Coffee Shops

    Traditional kopitiams, which serve sweetened coffee in no-frills surroundings, are a part of Malaysian national identity, but their survival is precarious.

  2. a photo of Northern Virginia's Crystal City.
    Life

    When Your Neighborhood Gets a Corporate Rebrand

    From National Landing to SoHa, neighborhoods often find themselves renamed by forces outside the community, from big companies to real estate firms.

  3. Transportation

    Electric Scooters Aren’t a Transportation Revolution Yet

    New data show a staggering rise in shared dockless e-scooter use nationwide. But commuting habits have seen little change since the dawn of micromobility.

  4. Life

    How to Inspire Girls to Become Carpenters and Electricians

    Male-dominated trades like construction, plumbing, and welding can offer job security and decent pay. A camp aims to show girls these careers are for them, too.

  5. Kaoutar Belhirech (left) and Fatima Tourari (right) in the Mères en Ligne radio station.
    Equity

    How a Radio Show Gives Unwed Mothers in Morocco a Voice

    Legal changes gave Moroccan women more rights, but unwed mothers still face prosecution and stigma. A Tangier radio station, Mères en Ligne, gives them a voice.