FloatingSheep.org

A fun new map from Floating Sheep marries the popularity of bars with the price of marijuana

The terrific cartographers over at Floating Sheep have mapped out what they're terming the "Slacker Strata," or "the opposite of the creative class." They've combined data from two of their previous mapping projects to come up with what's admittedly a "flippant" but nonetheless fun approach to identifying which places could potentially stymie creative people:

... it occurred to us that our two most popular maps – the Price of Weed and the Beer Belly of America – contained within them the means to provide a metric of sorts for the anti-creative class. Or at least places where the ability to be usefully creative would be severely compromised, i.e., where the price of marijuana is low and the availability of bars is high.

In other words, we're looking for the Slacker Strata of America, the list that no city wants to be on.

Interestingly enough, the map suggests a correlation between cities with relatively high levels of geotagged information about bars and those with relatively high prices for marijuana.

Wisconsin and Minnesota (with the high concentration of PBR cans in the map) consistently show up as high price locations according to the Price of Weed data. Likewise, the places with the lowest marijuana prices generally do not have high numbers of bars, with the possible exception of Northern California and Taylor’s hometown of Louisville, KY.

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