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Frank Lloyd Wright's iconic house goes digital

If you’ve never visited Fallingwater (and who are you?), now you can do so just by using your tablet or smartphone. Planet Architecture, a production company of documentaries and films about great architects and works of architecture, has released a Fallingwater app for the iPad and iPhone. Beyond high-res images and architectural drawings, the app offers 360° panoramic views of the house, interactive tours, animations, and 25 minutes of video from the documentary film “Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater,” with interviews and tours by the director of Fallingwater Lynda Waggoner and several historians. The iPad app markets at a relatively costly $9.99 rate, while the iPhone app can be yours for $4.99.

 

In more Fallingwater news–isn’t there always more?–we came across an impressive gingerbread rendition of the 20th Century’s most iconic house, complete with fondant cantilevers beset with sugar icicles and bending slightly under the perennial weight of gravity. The layered sandstone has been translated into stacks of SweetTarts, the rust-colored window casements recreated with some sort of red-colored candy variety (I’d like to think unraveled Twizzlers), and the “falling water” rendered in a sludge of aqua icing. Here’s to the holidays!

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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