Not all neighborhoods tip the same amounts for different ethnic take-out options

The crunchers over at Visual.ly put out a new map that shows just how much New Yorkers tip their take-out guys, using data from 3.5 million Seamless orders. The take-aways are kind of fascinating. Wall Street, it turns out, has the worst tippers in Manhattan, averaging just 12.31 percent per meal. Their neighbors in the West Village pay the most - an average of 14.24 percent.

The map also breaks out tips by type of food ordered - you can see, for example, that Brooklynites tip a whopping 18.87 percent for sandwiches while Midtowners pay just 11.07 percent for sushi. And it shows which ethnic food orders are most popular in which regions.

See the full map here.

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