Did the mayor cause the collapse of the city's electric company stock? That and other questions answered in today's news round-up

In Bogota:

  • The mayor took to Twitter to defend against attacks that comments earlier this week had caused the stock price of EEB to drop. Shares of EEB, a city-owned electric company, fell 17 percent after the mayor publicly questioned investments in Peru.
  • The city's river overflowed, making Bogota the "Venice of Colombia."
  • Plans for an $11.3 million "cosmetic surgery tourism complex" were unveiled this week. The center will offer breast implants and nose jobs along with "five-star accommodation."
  • And a slideshow of some of the city's 73 light displays, designed around the theme "All Under the Same Sky." Seven million lights bring animated characters and snowstorms to life.

Photo courtesy Reuters. Submit your photos to atlanticcities.postcard@gmail.com.

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