An artist with a penchant for depicting catastrophic collisions and other news

In Tel Aviv:

  • An escalator in city hall features the Star Wars opening crawl.
  • The Tel Aviv Museum of Art's new wing drew record crowds to its avant garde opening. One artist featured draws his insipration from catastrophes like car accidents. "Like a serial killer, I detach my emotions and search for the pattern," he said.
  • Citizens voted to turn a square into a parking lot.
  • The city's "gay park" has become too dangerous for its intended LGTB audience. "There's too much violence here. Groups are going around with pocket knives. People are afraid to go into the park,"said a 17-year-old member of the organization Israel Gay Youth told Haaretz. "I have a lot of friends who are afraid to pass through this area. I'm afraid to go there, too, and this is supposed to be the gay park."

Photo by Nir Elias/Reuters. Submit your photos to atlanticcities.postcard@gmail.com or add them to our Flickr page.

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