In 2012, the parents of every new baby will receive about $129 from the government, and other news

In Yerevan:

  • The embattled mayor of a tiny village joined a Yerevan protest against open-pit mining in the country's south.
  • The parents of every new baby born in Armenia next year will be given 50,000 drams (about $129) by the government.
  • The President and First Lady threw a Christmas party for the city's "large families."
  • A Russian couple was swindled out of $48,000 by a scam artist who sold them a fake storefront. The schemer promised to pay them back for two years, going so far as to threaten to sell a kidney to make good on his debts.

Photo by Flickr user 88mm.ch. Submit your photos to atlanticcities.postcard@gmail.com or add them to our Flickr page.

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