Reuters

Attendance records and income reports from America's largest art show

Art Basel Miami is more than just an art show - the four-day festival is serious business for art collectors, galleries and city officials. Here's a look at North America's biggest art fair by the numbers, courtesy of the Miami Herald:

Number of galleries: 260
Number of artists: 2,000
Number of attendees: 46,000
Percent of attendees from out-of-town: 35
Total sponsorship: $3.5 million
Expected ticket sales: $847,000
Cost of a booth: $590/square meter
Total budget: $17 million

Photo credit: Hans Deryk/Reuters

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