Courtesy of Architizer

In Luxembourg, an artist and architect team up on a new home

Earlier this year, Metaform atelier d’architecture asked Luxembourg graffiti artist Sumo to collaborate on a house in Luxembourg City. The architects were interested in reconciling urban development with artistic production in the built world, two seemingly opposed roles personified by Architect and Street Artist.

Sumo — a well-known street artist who owns a gallery — agreed to work on the project, and ended up covering most of the house with illustrations ranging from “cloud” screening patterns below to one-off pieces framing the interstitial interior volumes of the home. The paintings, say Metaform, emphasize the “formal game” of the architecture. Continue.

Sumo points to society’s shifting views on graffiti, moving away from “illegal vandalization” and towards “street art,” an essential part of the urban fabric. We’re living in a post-graffiti era, says Metaform,”even if many refuse to admit it.”

This article originally appeared at Architizer.com, an Atlantic partner site.

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