Perspectives from the year that was and a frame for the year ahead

The last week of the year is typically reserved for retrospective, and "best of" assessments. Yet, it can also be a time of hope, resolution, and prediction---an interlude of oracles and dreams.

Picture this about 2012---an urbanist calendar with places in mind---framed by international snapshots in time.

Each month of this urbanist calendar could echo experience, and provoke optimism through depiction of people and place.

Here is my composition, and perspective, from Seattle and beyond.

January:  Street Vending (Arusha, Tanzania)

 

February:  Street Watching (Matera, Italy)

 

March:  Street Blending (Vancouver, Canada)

 

April:  Life Amid the Creative Class (Gates Foundation, Seattle, USA)

 

May:  Urban Bicycles at Rest (Florence, Italy)

 

June:  Iconic Skyline (Seattle, USA)

 

July:  Urban Density at Work (Valetta, Malta)

 

August:  Transportation Choices (Nice, France)

 

September:  Nature in the City (Seattle, USA)

 

October:  Nightlife (Moscow, Idaho, USA)

 

November:  The Storefront at Rest (Lucera, Italy)

 

December:  The Laneway  (Melbourne, Australia)

All images by the author.

This post first appeared on MyUrbanist.com.

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