Reuters

Possums, wrenches, potato chips and other strange traditions

New Year's Eve isn't just for New Yorkers. Sure, they get their fancy ball drop, watched by millions. But cities and towns across the United States have their own traditions for ringing in the New Year.

One example—at midnight, the city of Lebanon will drop a 12-foot, 150-pound real bologna, a testament to the town's unique type of cured ham. In Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania, a broasted chicken will fall to the ground (below, a wonderful video of the event).

We've rounded up a handful of other strange traditions. Below, a slide show of the quirkiest approaches for heralding in 2012:

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A map of apartment searches in the U.S.
    Maps

    Where America’s Renters Want to Move Next

    A new report that tracks apartment searches between U.S. cities reveals the moving aspirations of a certain set of renters.

  2. A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.
    Life

    Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks at Night?

    Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

  3. A man walks by an abandoned home in Youngstown, Ohio
    Life

    How Some Shrinking Cities Are Still Prospering

    A study finds that some shrinking cities are prosperous areas with smaller, more-educated populations. But they also have greater levels of income inequality.

  4. Equity

    Why I Found My Community in a Starbucks

    I was reluctant to support a corporate chain. But in my neighborhood, it’s one of the only places I could have formed a relationship with someone like Sammy.

  5. A rendering of a co-living building in San Jose.
    Life

    The Largest Co-Living Building in the World Is Coming to San Jose

    The startup Starcity plans to build an 800-unit, 18-story “dorm for adults” to help affordably house Silicon Valley’s booming workforce.

×