Reuters

Possums, wrenches, potato chips and other strange traditions

New Year's Eve isn't just for New Yorkers. Sure, they get their fancy ball drop, watched by millions. But cities and towns across the United States have their own traditions for ringing in the New Year.

One example—at midnight, the city of Lebanon will drop a 12-foot, 150-pound real bologna, a testament to the town's unique type of cured ham. In Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania, a broasted chicken will fall to the ground (below, a wonderful video of the event).

We've rounded up a handful of other strange traditions. Below, a slide show of the quirkiest approaches for heralding in 2012:

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