A side-by-side take of the cities' quirks.

For those who have been to Paris and New York, it’s easy to see each city’s distinct charm. One city birthed the wandering flâneur, the other is home to speed walkers who live and work by a grid. In one city, coffee is to be savored in sips, and the other sees the beverage more or less as fuel. New York’s 24-hour subway is often taken for granted, while Parisians hardly notice Hector Guimard’s art nouveau Métro entryways anymore. And whether the Eiffel Tower or the Empire State is more iconic is impossible to discern at this point.

As polar opposite as Paris and New York may seem at times, it’s hard to love one city and hate the other. Each is complex in its offerings, diverse in its appeal, and the debate over which city is supreme evidently warrants its own blog. Vahram Muratyan is the author and artist behind Paris versus New York: A Tally of Two Cities, a blog that pits the pride and joy of both cities against each other in a magnificent series of minimalist prints. Through colorful graphics that border on 8-bit simplicity, Paris and New York come head to head, making it harder than ever to choose which city does it best.

The art has been turned into a book, which will be released tomorrow.

Prints are available for sale at Society6.

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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