Buyer beware before traveling to Oman

This colorful little graphic (put together by Visual.ly with data from Hotels.com) highlights the most and least expensive cities in the world to get a hotel room at the end of 2011. At the top of the list: Oman's Muscat, where the average room will set you back about $370 US, or £240.

And it looks like there's no end in sight, as Muscat's hotel prices rose about 50 percent between 2010 and 2011. Ibiza and São Paulo also saw big average price jumps. Prices fell the most in Doha and Beijing, two cities experiencing a hotel building boom.

You can see a larger version of the graphic here. Note that is uses £ instead of $ or , so adjust as necessary.

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a Tower Records Japan Inc. store in Tokyo, Japan.
    Life

    The Bankrupt American Brands Still Thriving in Japan

    Cultural cachet, licensing deals, and density explain why Toys ‘R’ Us, Tower Records, Barneys, and other faded U.S. retailers remain big across the Pacific.

  2. photo: a commuter looks at a small map of the London Tube in 2009
    Maps

    Help! The London Tube Map Is Out of Control.

    It’s never been easy to design a map of the city’s underground transit network. But soon, critics say, legibility concerns will demand a new look.

  3. Transportation

    How Media Coverage of Car Crashes Downplays the Role of Drivers

    Safety advocates have long complained that media outlets tend to blame pedestrians and cyclists who are hit by cars. Research suggests they’re right.

  4. photo: A vacant home in Oakland that is about to demolished for an apartment complex.
    Equity

    Fix California’s Housing Crisis, Activists Say. But Which One?

    As a controversy over vacancy in the Bay Area and Los Angeles reveals, advocates disagree about what kind of housing should be built, and where.

  5. Life

    Suburban Jobs Are Growing Fastest, But Urban Jobs Pay More

    New labor data show that the suburbs have the fastest job growth in the U.S. But we shouldn’t assume the future of employment will be suburban.

×