Reuters

A look at the best and worst designs from around the world

Each city's subway logo creates a lasting identity not only for the transit system, but for the city - an instantly recognizable icon that represents how we move from place to place. Most are simple (think of the letter 'M' or 'T' placed in a circle or square) but some get pretty complex.

We looked at the logos from nearly every major city's rapid transit system to see which ones worked and which ones really didn't. Here are some of our favorites:

And also, some in need of a serious redesign:

About the Author

Mark Byrnes
Mark Byrnes

Mark Byrnes is a senior associate editor at CityLab who writes about design, history, and photography.

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