The Estate of David Klein

1960s era posters illustrate cities around the world

From 1955 to 1965, David Klein produced award-winning design work for Trans World Airlines, creating artistic icons from America's "Jet Age."

As a member of a watercolor society in California, an illustrator for the U.S. Army, and an art director for a theatrical advertising agency in New York, Klein had a diverse background, making him a good choice for an international travel giant like TWA.

During this period of Klein's work, TWA was one of the world's most progressive and prestigious airlines. It was the first airline to hire an African-American flight attendant, the first to show in-flight movies and one of the first to use the Boeing 747. In 1962, TWA saw the opening of their still world-renown JFK terminal, which revolutionized airport design.

Klein's posters defined a destination with a recognizable icon and bold typeface. He helped create the notion among Americans that seeing the world meant flying TWA.

Courtesy of his estate, here's a look at some of Klein's acclaimed works for the airline (we highly recommend clicking the "full screen" option below for the best experience):

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