BYografia

At last, an apartment-based bike storage concept that could work for almost everyone

We'll admit, ever since our friends over at Architizer pointed us to this fantastic looking hanging bicycle bookshelf combo from Italian furniture designers BYografia, the cyclists among us on the Cities staff have been collectively drooling.

Unlike some of the apartment-based bicycle storage solutions Eric Jaffe wrote about a couple months back, such as this simple mounted shelf, BYografia's vertical "Bookbike" shelf doesn't a) require you to have a blank wall wide enough to accommodate the entire length of your bicycle or b) only work with bicycles that have a perfectly straight, relatively thin crossbar. Since the "Bookbike" lets you hang your bike vertically from the front wheel, it fits every bike.

But before you go running off to order one, two significant caveats. First, according to BYografia's website, the "Bookbike" won't be available until June. And second, it's expected to retail for a whopping €2,865, or more than $3,600. That's an awful lot of money to spend on a bookshelf, even one that also stores your bike. But now that this design is making the rounds, can an IKEA knock-off be too far behind? We're keeping our fingers crossed.

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