Kasey Kilmes/nextSTL

Decisive evidence that light rail makes neighborhoods more appealing, at least in St. Louis.

The unveiling of the latest census numbers has not brought good news to St. Louis for decades, but maybe that's changing.

According to this excellent infographic on NextSTL.com, about 83 percent of St. Louis neighborhoods with light rail access gained population between 2000 to 2010. Eighty-seven percent of the population gains were in neighborhoods categorized as "very walkable," according to WalkScore.com. Downtown, with the highest walk score in the city (92), has gained nearly 3,000 new residents since 2000.

Cities declining in population increasingly talk about shrinking their way to success. With growth along walkable and transit-accessible corridors, St. Louis looks to be doing just that.

Infographic designed by Kasey Klimes, courtesy of NextSTL.com. An enlarged version  of the infographic can be viewed here.

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