Reuters

San Francisco hopes to honor “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” on Valentine's Day.

Of all the songs written about San Francisco, one stands out, at least on Valentine's Day: “I Left My Heart in San Francisco,” of course. 

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee apparently couldn't agree more. He's planned a special tribute to the song (along with its original Tony Bennett recording, now 50 years old) for today's holiday. Festivities will include playing the tune over the loudspeakers at City Hall.

But loudspeakers alone aren’t enough for Lee. He’s made a request to all of the radio stations in town to do the same and play Bennett’s song today at noon.

KOIT, the city’s “lite rock, less talk” station, is planning to play the song, according to the mayor’s office. Radio Survivor reports that public/community radio station KALW will also play along, as will classical KDFC, and a number of local online-only stations.

But what about stations where crooners like Tony Bennett are a foreign concept, such as hip hop and R&B station 106 KMEL or classic rock station 107.7 The Bone? Does Mayor Lee carry enough political weight to make professional radio stations abandon their formats entirely in the middle of prime lunchtime listening? We reached out to several S.F. stations we thought might be least likely to already have Bennett in their rotations, but haven't heard back from any of them. Guess we’ll just have find out if they’re playing along the old fashioned way: by tuning in.

Photo credit: Mike Blake / Reuters

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