Anglotopia

The estimated number of security personnel needed for the London Olympics.

The London Olympics are still months away, but you can see their impact to date on the city in an infographic here, courtesy of Anglotopia. Among the most interesting stats:

  • McDonald's will open a 30,000 square-meter restaurant in time for the event. It's their biggest storefront to date.
  • 29.7 million tourists are expected to attend, and many will likely stay in the 120,000 hotel room reservations that were recently released by the Olympic Organizing Committee.
  • Two underground subway stops and three national rail locations will feed the park's nine venues.
  • 23,700 security staffers will be on hand for the duration of the games.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A sign outside a storefront in Buffalo, New York.
    Environment

    Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

    The Western New York city possesses a distinct mix of weather, geography, and infrastructure that could make it a potential climate haven. But for whom?

  2. A line of stores in Westport, Connecticut
    Equity

    Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing

    In southwest Connecticut, the gap between rich and poor is wider than anywhere else in the country. Invisible walls created by local zoning boards and the state government block affordable housing and, by extension, the people who need it.

  3. The Kunsthaus in Graz, Austria.
    Design

    The Prophetic Side of Archigram

    It’s easy to see the controversial group’s influence in left field architecture from High-Tech to Blobism 50 years later, but it’s easier still to see it in emerging technologies and the way we interact with them.

  4. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  5. An aisle in a grocery store
    Equity

    It's Not the Food Deserts: It's the Inequality

    A new study suggests that America’s great nutritional divide goes deeper than the problem of food access within cities.

×