Baku police officers grapple with an unlikely problem.

Azerbaijan's Objective TV (where, full disclosure, I volunteered last year) is one of the country's best sources of human rights and free speech news.

They are also, occasionally, the producers of truly excellent videos of livestock loose in the city's downtown.

Not too long ago, Baku was an almost agrarian capital. That's changed in the last ten years. Baku has sprouted an impressively modern downtown, full of plans for man-made Caspian islands and fancy hotels, marble parks and sky-scrapers in funny shapes.

But sometimes, the city's bucolic past collides with its present, in the form of a cow stuck in the middle of a traffic circle in the city's Fizuli Square. Watch the city's police grapple with what, exactly, they are to do below:

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