A wooden storage solution for your bike.

“I always imagined I would be an architect when I was younger because I was nerdy enough to enjoy the math and science portion of school while also being really interested in art,” says Chris Brigham of Knife & Saw. But when college came around, one decision led to another, and after graduating with a fine arts degree, Brigham found himself staring into the screen as a graphic designer for “one of the many doomed dot-coms of the time.”

After hopping from one start-up to the next (one of them being Google), Brigham couldn’t suppress his architectural streak any longer. No, he did not return to the throes of design school.

Instead, he turned his garage into a wood shop. "With that," says Brigham, "Knife & Saw was born." Brigham’s intuitive reverse engineering and affinity for minimalist design led him to build the Bike Shelf. Weighing in at 15 pounds, built out of solid black walnut or white ash, and starting at $299, the Bike Shelf is the slimmest and by far the most affordable of the bike-rack-bookshelf hybrids we’ve surveyed. With a Bike Shelf affixed to your wall, you can keep your bike indoors by slipping it into the level slot and plop your helmet, keys, or your collection of rare books right on top. Order yours here.

 

All images courtesy Knife & Saw

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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