Cornell has chosen six firms to submit designs for its new campus. Here's a look at university projects they've worked on in the past.

Today, Cornell unveiled the six architecture firms that will submit their ideas for the school's much anticipated Roosevelt Island campus in New York City. 

The nominees are Skidmore Owings & Merrill, Diller, Scofidio + RenfroOffice for Metropolitan ArchitectureSteven HollMorphosis, and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Each firm has experience designing for academic institutions and all but OMA have done previous work in New York City.

To get a better idea of what kind of work each firm does, we've put together a slideshow of education-related works by selected architects:

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