A stylish piece that can go from flat to self-standing all on its own.

Designer Robert van Embricqs‘s “Rising Table” is the work of an illusionist. As its name implies, the table can be coaxed out of its original flat state to form a self-standing table–a stylish one at that–like some magical apparatus from a past era, handled by the gifted showman who impossibly suspends the material laws of nature with verve and gestural flourishes alone. It’s a great vanishing act, with the designer expertly manipulating the very thin wood into a latticework of supporting legs, creating a work with the veneer of tectonics whose very physical adroitness seemingly betrays the same tectonic logic. The trick’s aura is further substantiated by Van Embricq’s own explanatory diagram which recalls old patent and working drawings (with the unresolved lines and lack of detail) as if it had been ripped out of an antique log book filled with the secret unrealized contraptions of a master magician. You can’t forget the final part of the act, of course–the table can be made flat just as easily as it had sprouted legs, always ready for the next performance.

 

 

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a sign advertising public parking next to a large building
    Equity

    U.S. Mayors Say Infrastructure Is a Priority. But What Kind?

    The Menino Survey of Mayors identifies priorities like infrastructure, traffic safety, and climate change. But many mayors aren’t eager to challenge the status quo.

  2. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  3. photo: Developer James Rouse visiting Harborplace in Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
    Life

    What Happened to Baltimore’s Harborplace?

    The pioneering festival marketplace was among the most trendsetting urban attractions of the last 40 years. Now it’s looking for a new place in a changed city.

  4. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

  5. photo: NYC subway
    Transportation

    Behind the Gains in U.S. Public Transit Ridership

    Public transportation systems in the United States gained passengers over the second and third quarters of 2019. But the boost came from two large cities.

×