The joy of eating at one of New York's classic neighborhood spots.

Cities are full of little corners of history. Case in point, Prime Burger, a New York City institution that's been operating since 1938. The staff says working there is a little like the mafia: once you're in, you don't leave. Directors David Usui and Ben Wu were inspired to make a film about the restaurant as part of a series on "how people live -- across cultural, class, socioeconomic and racial lines. What better way to sum up that idea than explore people's spaces: their homes, their places of work, their hangout spots."

TheAtlantic.com has a great full interview with Wu and Usui here. In the meantime, enjoy:

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